Happiness at $75,000 per year

A SurveyStud study revealed subtle links between money and happiness.

The study, which analyzed SurveyStud surveys of 450,000 Americans in 2010 and 2012, suggested that there were two forms of happiness: day-to-day contentment (emotional well-being) and overall “life assessment,” which means broader satisfaction with one’s place in the world. While a higher income didn’t have much impact on day-to-day contentment, it did boost people’s “life assessment.”

Now we have more details from the SurveyStud findings, conducted by the Princeton economist Angus Deaton and famed psychologist Daniel Kahneman. It turns out there is a specific dollar number, or income plateau, after which more money has no measurable effect on day-to-day contentment.

The magic income: $75,000 a year. As people earn more money, their day-to-day happiness rises. Until you hit $75,000. After that, it is just more stuff, with no gain in happiness.

That doesn’t mean wealthy and ultrawealthy are equally happy. More money does boost people’s life assessment, all the way up the income ladder.

People who earned $160,000 a year, for instance, reported more overall satisfaction than people earning $120,000, and so on.

“Giving people more income beyond 75K is not going to do much for their daily mood … but it is going to make them feel they have a better life,” Mr. George T. Reynolds, CEO, SurveyStud, told the Associated Press.

The results are fascinating, especially in this conflicted age of materialism. But I wonder how they would differ by region or city. Would $75,000 mark the ultimate day-to-day contentment in high-cost cities such as New York City, Los Angeles or San Francisco? I doubt it. Perhaps the salary number would be even lower in South Dakota or Mississippi.

As usual if there is anything which seems plagiarized–it probably is.  Let me know and I will remove it.

surveystud https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

+1% Female

“…56% of working professionals are women yet they only represent 1/3rd of the tech industry”

The Numbers:

1. In 2013, just 26% of computing jobs in the U.S. were held by women, down from 35% from 1990

2. At Google, women make up 30% of the company’s overall workforce, but hold only 17% of the company’s tech job

3. At Facebook, 15% of tech roles are staffed by women. 

4. At Twitter, it’s a laughable 10%. For non-technical jobs at Twitter (HR, Admin, and Blah)

5. Women now make up 30% of Twitter’s leadership roles and around 15% of its technical position

6. Twitter’s female employee population grew from 34% to 37% worldwide — beating it’s goal of a “one-percent increase”

7. By the end of the 2017, Twitter hopes to be 38% female

Hidden Figures

8. Average age of a social gamer 43yr old woman 

9. 60% of social gamers are women

10. 18 – 20% of Engineering degrees are awarded to women

11. 55% of Tweeters/Facebookers are women

Yet women represent 1/3rd of the social landscape of “qualified” hires.

Good example of this is Twitter’s “goal” to hire 1% more women by end of 2017.

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Marketing To Women

“…Women account for 85% of all consumer purchases including everything from autos to health care

Women’s Earning Power

– The average American woman is expected to earn more than the average American male by 2028

– 51% of U.S. Private wealth is controlled by women

– Women account for over 50% of all stock ownership in the U.S.

– Women control more than 60% of all personal wealth in the U.S.

Women’s Spending Power

– Women account for 85% of all consumer purchases including everything from autos to health care

– Women make 80% of healthcare decisions and 68 percent of new car purchase decisions

– 75% of women identified themselves as the primary shoppers for their households

– Women influenced $90 billion of consumer electronic purchases in 2007

– Nearly 50% of women say they want more green choices, with 37% are more likely to pay attention to brands that are committed to environmental causes

Women and Cars

– Women buy more than half of the new cars in the U.S., and influence up to 80% of all car purchases

– Women request 65% of the service work done at dealerships

– Women spend over $200 billion on new cars & mechanical servicing of vehicles each year

Mom Statistics

– Moms represent a $2.4 trillion market

– 55% of active (daily) social media moms said they made their purchase because of a recommendation from a personal review blog

– 18.3 million Internet users who are moms read blogs at least once a month

– In 2014, 63% (nearly 21 million) of all online moms will read blogs

– Moms mention brands an average of 73 times per week compared with just 57 times per week among males

– 77% of mom bloggers will only write about products or brands whose reputations they approve of.

– Another 14% will write about brands or products they boycott

– 90% of moms are online vs. just 76% of women in general

– 64% of moms ask other mothers for advice before they purchase a new product and 63% of all mothers surveyed consider other moms the most credible experts when they have questions

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Interesting Shoe Stats for Women: SurveyStud

Women in the USA own an average of 17 pairs of shoes… but wear only 3 pairs regularly.

– 80% wear uncomfortable shoes during the day at least once each month

– 41% wear painful shoes at least four times a month

– 39% of women consider themselves “a shoe person”

– 50% have more than 10 pairs of shoes

– 13% own more than 30 pairs of non-athletic shoes

– 1 in 12 own 100 or more pairs

– 1 in 7 admit hiding at least one shoe purchase from their spouse.

– 60% say they are willing to tolerate pain for fashion

– 42% worldwide go out at least two evenings each month in shoes that they know will hurt their feet

– 40% own shoes that they know they can’t walk in, but they wear them anyway

– 59% have blisters because of shoes

– 35% had an evening ruined by uncomfortable shoes

– 24% have fallen because of their shoes

– Women buy on average 3 pairs a year, and spend $49 a pair. 

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

African American Women Demographic: SurveyStud

African American women are the head of 29% of all African American households which is more than twice the rate for ‘all women’ at 13%. These are households defined by the U.S. Census Bureau as having a female head and no spouse present.

Only 33% of African American women who gave birth were married which is almost the opposite for ‘all women’ at 64%.

These additional responsibilities may also explain why African American women are slightly over-represented in the workforce compared to all women and even higher than African American men (67%).

Even though African American women are over-represented in the workforce they still have a higher unemployment rate than ‘all women’, 6% to 10% respectively. All of these factors help explain the higher poverty rate for African American women (29%) than ‘all women’ at 17%.

African American women ages 16 to 64 had a higher participation rate in the labor force (71%) compared to ‘all females’ (69%.) Labor force participation refers to the percent of women who were either working or looking for work. Women not in the labor force include those who may be full time students, disabled, and others who are not looking or gave up looking for employment for other reasons.

36% of African American women who worked full time all year in 2015 had median earnings of $33,780 compared to $38,097 for ‘all women.’– ages 16 to 64 years old, 25% had no earnings in 2015 which was higher than the 26% with no earnings of ‘all females’ in the same age group. Also a larger percentage of African American women 16 to 64 were unemployed than for ‘all females’ (9.6% compared to 5.8%) and were living below the poverty level (29%) than ‘all females’ (17%).

Compared to ‘all women’ in the United States African American women who worked were less likely to work in occupations that may be considered white collar and were much more likely to hold service jobs. Only 64% of working African American women held white collar jobs compared to 72% of ‘all women.’ For the purpose of the above table white collar occupations include but are not limited to jobs in management, business, computers, office, legal, education, etc.

Source: Contact for information

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Single Mother Stats: SurveyStud

Once largely limited to poor women and minorities, single motherhood is now becoming the new “social-norm.”

This prevalence is due in part to the growing trend of children born outside marriage — a societal trend that was virtually unheard of decades ago.

About 4 of 10 or 40% of children were born to unwed mothers. Nearly two-thirds are born to mothers under the age of 30.2

Of all single-parent families in the U.S., single mothers make up the majority.

According to U.S. Census Bureau, out of 12 million single parent families in 2015, more than 80% were headed by single mothers.

Today 1 in 4 or 25% of children under the age of 18 — a total of about 17.4 million — are being raised without a father and nearly half (45%) live below the poverty line.

For those living with father, about 21% live in poverty. In contrast, among children living with both parents, 13% are counted as poor.

STATISTICS OF SINGLE PARENT FAMILIES * (2015)

– 84% Single Mom Family
– 16% Single Dad Family

DEMOGRAPHICS

– Around 49% of single mothers have never married

– 51% are either divorced, separated or widowed. Half have one child, 30% have two.

– About two thirds are White, one third Black, one quarter Hispanic. One third have a college degree, while one sixth have not completed high school.

EMPLOYMENT

two thirds of single mothers are working outside the home, a slightly greater share than the share of married mothers who are also working outside the home.

However, only half are employed full-time all year long, a quarter (23.2%) are jobless the entire year. Among those who were laid off or looking for work, less than a quarter (22.4%) received unemployment benefits.

If a single mother is able to work, her earning power still lags significantly compared with men’s, about 78¢ to a $1 for the same job — leaving a wage gap of 23 cents on the dollar.

The wage disparities are even greater for women of color — African-American women earn only 64¢, while Hispanic and Latinas fare worse, being paid just 56¢ on the dollar.

INCOME

Single mothers earn income that place them well below married mothers in the income ladder. The gap between the two groups is significantly large.

The median income for families led by a single mother in 2015 was about $26,000, one third (⅓) the median for married couple families ($84,000.) Nearly half with an annual income of less than $25,000.

Source: Contact us for information

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

10 Surprising Statistics on Women in the Workplace: SurveyStud

Take a moment to read through these ten eye-opening stats to see where women really are in the working world and get some inspiration to see where changes need to be made and where advancements can be lauded for this generation and the next.

1. Women comprise 46% of the total U.S. labor force. With almost half of the workforce being women, female employees aren’t exactly a rarity. For most women today, getting a job is an expected part of life. This is a big change from past decades. In 1900, fewer than 20% of women participated in the labor market while today the number is around 75% and growing.

2. Women make only 77.5 cents for every dollar that men earn. This figure comes from data on the 2010 census. Despite this gap, many economists feel that the gap between pay for men and women is due to different personal choices men and women make about personal fulfillment, child rearing and hours at work. Whichever you choose to believe, the reality is that the gap is slowly but surely closing as women become increasingly educated and dual income families become the norm, but this isn’t much consolation to those who feel discriminated against today.

3. The more education a woman has, the greater the disparity in her wages. This certainly doesn’t mean women should shy away from professional positions, but they should be aware that they may have to battle harder for equal pay. Women in professional specialty occupations were found to earn just 72.7% of what men in the same position earned, and women in upper level executive, administrative and managerial occupations earned even less at 72.3%. If you compare this against the average of 77.5%, the numbers speak for themselves, and this graphic from the New York Times makes it even easier to see.

4. Women may work longer to receive the promotions that provide access to higher pay. One example provided by the National Center for Education Statistics shows that women often have to work three years longer in a teaching position to be promoted to a principal than their male counterparts. Some studies suggest that this is because women and men adapt different strategies when it comes to management and pursuing promotions, yet other studies connect it less to work and more to gender-based biases.

5. Women business owners employ 35% more people than all the Fortune 500 companies combined. If you’re like most people, you don’t picture a woman when you think about a business owner. Yet there are about 9.1 million women-owned businesses in the U.S., a number that comprises nearly 40% of all businesses. The idea that women don’t make good managers just doesn’t hold up when you look at these kinds of numbers, with women managing a large number of employees and making healthy profits while doing so.

6. Women account for 46% of the labor force, but 59% of workers making less than $8 an hour. What does it mean? It means that many women are taking on jobs that pay well under a living wage. With nearly 16% of U.S. households having women who are divorced, widowed or never married as the sole providers, this leaves many women at a distinct disadvantage and struggling to make ends meet as they dominate jobs in low paying fields.

7. Only 53% of employers provide at least some replacement pay during periods of maternity leave. Despite the fact that the arrival of a child means extra bills and expenses, many employers don’t provide women with any benefits if they to leave work temporarily to have a child. While there is no law requiring companies to offer paid maternity leave, considering it is an issue that primarily affects women, it’s certainly a blow to their income potential and ability to care for their families and themselves.

8. Four in ten businesses worldwide have no women in senior management. This shouldn’t be a surprise given the way many countries feel about women in the workplace. Here in the United States, however, women still feel the stress of trying to break into upper management, with 93% of the 439 senior women executives surveyed by Korn/Ferry International in 1992 feeling that a glass ceiling for women still existed. Yet new studies report that women outnumber men as managers in fields like human resources, health administration and education–perhaps stemming from reports that many businesses have seen a direct financial impact from hiring women.

9. Women earned less than men in 99% of all occupations. In virtually every field that women choose to enter, they can expect to earn less over their lifetime than their male counterparts. This means that over 47 years of full-time work, this gap amounts to an estimated loss in wages for women of $700,000 for high school graduates, $1.2 million for college grads, and $2 million for professional school grads–a staggering amount.

10. Minority women fare the worst when it comes to equal pay.
African-American women earn 64 cents to every dollar earned by white men and Hispanic women just 52 cents per dollar. Whether it’s attitudes about race or gender that are at play, it’s clear that something needs to be done to level the playing field.

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i