High-Heels and Pain

“… After one hour, six minutes and 48 seconds heels start to hurt”

You can’t handle feet for a living without encountering some of the unfortunate side effects of wearing high heels — like foot pain, corns, and calluses. We (SurveyStud) surveyed 503 women about their high-heel habits, and the results are:

• 72% of women wear high-heeled shoes (39% wear heels daily, while 33% wear them less often)

• 59% report toe pain as a result of wearing uncomfortable shoes; 54% report pain in the ball of the foot

• 58% of women purchased new high-heeled shoes in the last year

• Women who wear high heels daily tend to be younger and are more likely to wear uncomfortable shoes

• Younger women are more likely to experience blisters and pain in the arches of their feet than older women. Older women are more likely to experience corns, calluses, and bunions

Why women wear high heels:

• 82%  for fashion or style
• 73%  to complete professional attire
• 54%  to look sexier and more attractive
• 48%  to enhance their legs
• 39%  to appear taller

Even after pressing these facts to our surveyed population 71% said they will continue to wear 👠.

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Women Aren’t Equal to Men

The feminist movement has made gigantic strides over the years—but nearly a century since women were given the right to vote, the sad fact of the matter is: 

1. Women in the U.S. working full- and part-time make 84% of what men earn 

2. Women make 16% less money than their male counterparts

3. Women make up nearly 51% of the U.S. population–yet only 20% of the U.S. Congress is comprised of women

4. 15.5% of women live in poverty 

5. Women  report 37% of the stories in print, and on the internet, they write 42% of the news

6. Women on average comprise about 30% of the workforce at tech companies 

7. 70% of women worldwide experience a form of domestic violence at least once in their life

8. 11% of women age 65 and older live below the poverty line

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Female Orgasm Stats: SurveyStud

Research shows that how a woman feels about her genitals is linked to the quality of her orgasms.

“…most women require at least 20 minutes of sexual activity to climax.”

– 1 in 3 women have trouble reaching orgasm when having sex

– 80% of women have difficulty with orgasm from vaginal intercourse alone

– 43% of women suffer from “Female Sexual Dysfunction” (FSD), which encompasses the inability to orgasm

– 61% of women ages 18 to 24 experienced orgasm the last time they had sex

– 65% of women in their 30s experienced orgasm the last time they had sex

– 70% of women in their 40s – 50s experienced orgasm the last time they had sex

– 67% of women have faked an orgasm

– 85% of men thought their partner had an orgasm during their most recent episode of sex, only 64% of women reported having an orgasm

– 50% of women said their partners were almost there but just couldn’t quite bring them home

– 38% of women claimed there wasn’t enough clitoral stimulation

– 35% of women said they weren’t getting the right kind of clitoral stimulation

– 78% of women believed their partners cared about their orgasm

– 72% of women experienced a time when their partner climaxed but made no attempt to help them finish

– 39% of women reach most of their orgasms through use of a hand or sex toy

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Interesting Shoe Stats for Women: SurveyStud

Women in the USA own an average of 17 pairs of shoes… but wear only 3 pairs regularly.

– 80% wear uncomfortable shoes during the day at least once each month

– 41% wear painful shoes at least four times a month

– 39% of women consider themselves “a shoe person”

– 50% have more than 10 pairs of shoes

– 13% own more than 30 pairs of non-athletic shoes

– 1 in 12 own 100 or more pairs

– 1 in 7 admit hiding at least one shoe purchase from their spouse.

– 60% say they are willing to tolerate pain for fashion

– 42% worldwide go out at least two evenings each month in shoes that they know will hurt their feet

– 40% own shoes that they know they can’t walk in, but they wear them anyway

– 59% have blisters because of shoes

– 35% had an evening ruined by uncomfortable shoes

– 24% have fallen because of their shoes

– Women buy on average 3 pairs a year, and spend $49 a pair. 

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Effective Feedback: SurveyStud

Feedback is valuable information that will be used to make important decisions. Top performing companies are top performing companies because they consistently search for ways to make their best even better. For top performing companies ‘continuous improvement’ is not just a showy catchphrase.

Effective feedback has benefits for the giver, the receiver, and the wider organization. Here are five reasons why feedback is so important.

1. Feedback is always there. If you ask someone in your organization when feedback occurs, they will typically mention an employee survey, performance appraisal, or training evaluation. In actuality, feedback is around us all the time. Every time we speak to a person, employee, customer, vendor, etc., we communicate feedback. In actuality, it’s impossible not to give feedback.

2. Feedback is effective listening. Whether the feedback is done verbally or via a feedback survey, the person providing the feedback needs to know they have been understood (or received) and they need to know that their feedback provides some value. When conducting a survey, always explain why respondents’ feedback is important and how their feedback will be used.

3. Feedback can motivate. By asking for feedback, it can actually motivate employees to perform better. Employees like to feel valued and appreciate being asked to provide feedback that can help formulate business decisions. And feedback from client, suppliers, vendors, and stakeholders can be used to motivate to build better working relations

4. Feedback can improve performance. Feedback is often mistaken for criticism. In fact, what is viewed as negative criticism is actually constructive criticism and is the best find of feedback that can help to formulate better decisions to improve and increase performance.

5. Feedback is a tool for continued learning. Invest time in asking and learning about how others experience working with your organization. Continued feedback is important across the entire organization in order to remain aligned to goals, create strategies, develop products and services improvements, improve relationships, and much more. Continued learning is the key to improving.

10 Surprising Statistics on Women in the Workplace: SurveyStud

Take a moment to read through these ten eye-opening stats to see where women really are in the working world and get some inspiration to see where changes need to be made and where advancements can be lauded for this generation and the next.

1. Women comprise 46% of the total U.S. labor force. With almost half of the workforce being women, female employees aren’t exactly a rarity. For most women today, getting a job is an expected part of life. This is a big change from past decades. In 1900, fewer than 20% of women participated in the labor market while today the number is around 75% and growing.

2. Women make only 77.5 cents for every dollar that men earn. This figure comes from data on the 2010 census. Despite this gap, many economists feel that the gap between pay for men and women is due to different personal choices men and women make about personal fulfillment, child rearing and hours at work. Whichever you choose to believe, the reality is that the gap is slowly but surely closing as women become increasingly educated and dual income families become the norm, but this isn’t much consolation to those who feel discriminated against today.

3. The more education a woman has, the greater the disparity in her wages. This certainly doesn’t mean women should shy away from professional positions, but they should be aware that they may have to battle harder for equal pay. Women in professional specialty occupations were found to earn just 72.7% of what men in the same position earned, and women in upper level executive, administrative and managerial occupations earned even less at 72.3%. If you compare this against the average of 77.5%, the numbers speak for themselves, and this graphic from the New York Times makes it even easier to see.

4. Women may work longer to receive the promotions that provide access to higher pay. One example provided by the National Center for Education Statistics shows that women often have to work three years longer in a teaching position to be promoted to a principal than their male counterparts. Some studies suggest that this is because women and men adapt different strategies when it comes to management and pursuing promotions, yet other studies connect it less to work and more to gender-based biases.

5. Women business owners employ 35% more people than all the Fortune 500 companies combined. If you’re like most people, you don’t picture a woman when you think about a business owner. Yet there are about 9.1 million women-owned businesses in the U.S., a number that comprises nearly 40% of all businesses. The idea that women don’t make good managers just doesn’t hold up when you look at these kinds of numbers, with women managing a large number of employees and making healthy profits while doing so.

6. Women account for 46% of the labor force, but 59% of workers making less than $8 an hour. What does it mean? It means that many women are taking on jobs that pay well under a living wage. With nearly 16% of U.S. households having women who are divorced, widowed or never married as the sole providers, this leaves many women at a distinct disadvantage and struggling to make ends meet as they dominate jobs in low paying fields.

7. Only 53% of employers provide at least some replacement pay during periods of maternity leave. Despite the fact that the arrival of a child means extra bills and expenses, many employers don’t provide women with any benefits if they to leave work temporarily to have a child. While there is no law requiring companies to offer paid maternity leave, considering it is an issue that primarily affects women, it’s certainly a blow to their income potential and ability to care for their families and themselves.

8. Four in ten businesses worldwide have no women in senior management. This shouldn’t be a surprise given the way many countries feel about women in the workplace. Here in the United States, however, women still feel the stress of trying to break into upper management, with 93% of the 439 senior women executives surveyed by Korn/Ferry International in 1992 feeling that a glass ceiling for women still existed. Yet new studies report that women outnumber men as managers in fields like human resources, health administration and education–perhaps stemming from reports that many businesses have seen a direct financial impact from hiring women.

9. Women earned less than men in 99% of all occupations. In virtually every field that women choose to enter, they can expect to earn less over their lifetime than their male counterparts. This means that over 47 years of full-time work, this gap amounts to an estimated loss in wages for women of $700,000 for high school graduates, $1.2 million for college grads, and $2 million for professional school grads–a staggering amount.

10. Minority women fare the worst when it comes to equal pay.
African-American women earn 64 cents to every dollar earned by white men and Hispanic women just 52 cents per dollar. Whether it’s attitudes about race or gender that are at play, it’s clear that something needs to be done to level the playing field.

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Breast Cancer Stats 2016: SurveyStud

In 2016, an estimated 246,660 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in women in the U.S., along with 61,000 new cases of non-invasive (in situ) breast cancer.

1 in 8 or 12% of U.S. women will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime.

About 2,600 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in men in 2016. A man’s lifetime risk of breast cancer is about 1 in 1,000.

Breast cancer incidence rates in the U.S. began decreasing in the year 2000, after increasing for the previous two decades. They dropped by 7% from 2002 to 2003 alone. One theory is that this decrease was partially due to the reduced use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) by women after the results of a large study called the Women’s Health Initiative were published in 2002. These results suggested a connection between HRT and increased breast cancer risk.

About 40,450 women in the U.S. are expected to die in 2016 from breast cancer, though death rates have been decreasing since 1989. Women under 50 have experienced larger decreases. These decreases are thought to be the result of treatment advances, earlier detection through screening, and increased awareness.

For women in the U.S., breast cancer death rates are higher than those for any other cancer, besides lung cancer.

Besides skin cancer, breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among American women. In 2016, it’s estimated that just under 30% of newly diagnosed cancers in women will be breast cancers.

In women under 45, breast cancer is more common in African-American women than white women. Overall, African-American women are more likely to die of breast cancer. For Asian, Hispanic, and Native-American women, the risk of developing and dying from breast cancer is lower.

In 2016, there are more than 2.8 million women with a history of breast cancer in the U.S. This includes women currently being treated and women who have finished treatment.

A woman’s risk of breast cancer nearly doubles if she has a first-degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) who has been diagnosed with breast cancer. Less than 15% of women who get breast cancer have a family member diagnosed with it.

About 5-10% of breast cancers can be linked to gene mutations (abnormal changes) inherited from one’s mother or father. Mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are the most common. On average, women with a BRCA1 mutation have a 55-65% lifetime risk of developing breast cancer. For women with a BRCA2 mutation, the risk is 45%. Breast cancer that is positive for the BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations tends to develop more often in younger women. An increased ovarian cancer risk is also associated with these genetic mutations. In men, BRCA2 mutations are associated with a lifetime breast cancer risk of about 6.8%; BRCA1 mutations are a less frequent cause of breast cancer in men.

About 85% of breast cancers occur in women who have no family history of breast cancer. These occur due to genetic mutations that happen as a result of the aging process and life in general, rather than inherited mutations.

The most significant risk factors for breast cancer are gender (being a woman) and age (growing older).

Source: BreastCancer.org

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i