Happiness at $75,000 per year

A SurveyStud study revealed subtle links between money and happiness.

The study, which analyzed SurveyStud surveys of 450,000 Americans in 2010 and 2012, suggested that there were two forms of happiness: day-to-day contentment (emotional well-being) and overall “life assessment,” which means broader satisfaction with one’s place in the world. While a higher income didn’t have much impact on day-to-day contentment, it did boost people’s “life assessment.”

Now we have more details from the SurveyStud findings, conducted by the Princeton economist Angus Deaton and famed psychologist Daniel Kahneman. It turns out there is a specific dollar number, or income plateau, after which more money has no measurable effect on day-to-day contentment.

The magic income: $75,000 a year. As people earn more money, their day-to-day happiness rises. Until you hit $75,000. After that, it is just more stuff, with no gain in happiness.

That doesn’t mean wealthy and ultrawealthy are equally happy. More money does boost people’s life assessment, all the way up the income ladder.

People who earned $160,000 a year, for instance, reported more overall satisfaction than people earning $120,000, and so on.

“Giving people more income beyond 75K is not going to do much for their daily mood … but it is going to make them feel they have a better life,” Mr. George T. Reynolds, CEO, SurveyStud, told the Associated Press.

The results are fascinating, especially in this conflicted age of materialism. But I wonder how they would differ by region or city. Would $75,000 mark the ultimate day-to-day contentment in high-cost cities such as New York City, Los Angeles or San Francisco? I doubt it. Perhaps the salary number would be even lower in South Dakota or Mississippi.

As usual if there is anything which seems plagiarized–it probably is.  Let me know and I will remove it.

surveystud https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

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High-Heels and Pain

“… After one hour, six minutes and 48 seconds heels start to hurt”

You can’t handle feet for a living without encountering some of the unfortunate side effects of wearing high heels — like foot pain, corns, and calluses. We (SurveyStud) surveyed 503 women about their high-heel habits, and the results are:

• 72% of women wear high-heeled shoes (39% wear heels daily, while 33% wear them less often)

• 59% report toe pain as a result of wearing uncomfortable shoes; 54% report pain in the ball of the foot

• 58% of women purchased new high-heeled shoes in the last year

• Women who wear high heels daily tend to be younger and are more likely to wear uncomfortable shoes

• Younger women are more likely to experience blisters and pain in the arches of their feet than older women. Older women are more likely to experience corns, calluses, and bunions

Why women wear high heels:

• 82%  for fashion or style
• 73%  to complete professional attire
• 54%  to look sexier and more attractive
• 48%  to enhance their legs
• 39%  to appear taller

Even after pressing these facts to our surveyed population 71% said they will continue to wear 👠.

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

+1% Female

“…56% of working professionals are women yet they only represent 1/3rd of the tech industry”

The Numbers:

1. In 2013, just 26% of computing jobs in the U.S. were held by women, down from 35% from 1990

2. At Google, women make up 30% of the company’s overall workforce, but hold only 17% of the company’s tech job

3. At Facebook, 15% of tech roles are staffed by women. 

4. At Twitter, it’s a laughable 10%. For non-technical jobs at Twitter (HR, Admin, and Blah)

5. Women now make up 30% of Twitter’s leadership roles and around 15% of its technical position

6. Twitter’s female employee population grew from 34% to 37% worldwide — beating it’s goal of a “one-percent increase”

7. By the end of the 2017, Twitter hopes to be 38% female

Hidden Figures

8. Average age of a social gamer 43yr old woman 

9. 60% of social gamers are women

10. 18 – 20% of Engineering degrees are awarded to women

11. 55% of Tweeters/Facebookers are women

Yet women represent 1/3rd of the social landscape of “qualified” hires.

Good example of this is Twitter’s “goal” to hire 1% more women by end of 2017.

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

WOMEN ACTUALLY WATCH PORN?

…Because more and more women are watching porn these days

1. 23% or about 1 out of 5 women watch porn

2. 35% or about 1 out of 3 women in Philippines and Brazil watch porn

3. When searching for porn on the net, top three most-searched terms by women are, in order: “lesbian,” “threesome” and “squirt.”

4. When on a porn site, categories women are most likely to frequent: “Lesbian,” “Gay (male)” and “Big Dick.”

5. 300% search increase (among women) for porn featuring rough sex with titles like: “‘rough f*ck’and ‘f*cked hard screaming.”

6. 125% increase in searches for “romantic sex.”

7. 240% increase in women searching porn sites for terms like “daddy” and “step-dad”

8.  By Country

9.  Within the United States

Taking a closer look at the United States, the study (SurveyStud) also looked at what category, after “Lesbian,” was most viewed in each state in comparison to women’s preferences across the country. 

The “Ebony” category is popular among the Southern states, “Bondage” is big in Missouri, Ohio and Pennsylvania, and Washington women are randomly into Hentai. 

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Women & Money Stats

I am often asked why I have a special site/group/event just for women dealing with money. Here are 13 reasons why:

1. According to the average life expectancy for women is 81 years, compared to 73 years for men. (The Social Security Administration)

2. The average age of widowhood is 55 years old. (US Census Bureau)

3. Women are more likely than men to be single parents. (U.S. Census Bureau, “American Community Survey, 2008,” Tables B11001, B11002, B11005, and B11013)

4. Nearly half of women (44 percent) expect to retire at age 70 or older – including 19 percent of those who “do not plan to retire.” (Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies)

5. The median earnings for all women are $638 a week, compared to $798 for men–approximately 80 percent of what men earn on average (The Bureau of Labor Statistics)

6. The average woman spends 15% of her working years outside of the workforce caring for children and elderly parents compared to the average man’s 1.6%. (Women’s Institute for a Secure Retirement and National Center for Women’s Retirement Research)

7. Nearly two-thirds of U.S. women ages 40 to 79 have already dealt with a major financial “life crisis,” such as job loss, divorce, the death of a spouse, or serious illness. (AARP, “Understanding Women’s Financial Needs and Behavior,” 2007 survey.)

8. In 80% of the nation’s households women are the primary decision makers regarding purchases. (PeopleSupport, as cited on http://www.womanmotorist.com)

9. 80-90% of women will be solely responsible for their finances at some point in their lives- mainly due to divorce and the fact that on average women outlive men by seven years (National Center for Women and retirement research)

10. Even though women have a longer life expectancies, when asked how much they were aiming for in retirement savings, women aimed lower, with a median goal of $200,000 versus $400,000 for men. (Retirement Fitness Survey 2010)

11. Fewer than two in 10 women feel “very prepared” to make wise financial decisions. Half indicate that they “need some help,” and one-third feels that they “need a lot of help.” (Financial Experience &Behaviors Among Women 2010−2011 Prudential Research Study)

12. Social Security provides over half of women’s income over the age of 65, 67% to be exact. (Social Security: Especially Vital to Women- IWPR analysis of the 2010 Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement)

13. The number of middle and upper income women struggling with debt has risen faster than the number of lower income women struggling with debt. (Women, Debt and Recession, CareOne Debt Relief Services)
 

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Women & Online Dating Stats: SurveyStud

– If you are a woman, you have 15 minutes to make a first impression on a man

– 43% of women have Googled someone on the internet before a first date

– 53% of women find a great smile the most attractive feature

– 80% of men date women that are at least 5 years younger than them

– 76% of women date men that are at least 5 years older than them

– 52% of women feel they are too busy to meet other singles

– 60% of women and 64% of men don’t talk about politics on a first date

– 88% of women find money to be very important in a relationship

– 17% chance of liking a date set up by a friend

– 48% of breakups in online relationships occur thru email

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Interesting Shoe Stats for Women: SurveyStud

Women in the USA own an average of 17 pairs of shoes… but wear only 3 pairs regularly.

– 80% wear uncomfortable shoes during the day at least once each month

– 41% wear painful shoes at least four times a month

– 39% of women consider themselves “a shoe person”

– 50% have more than 10 pairs of shoes

– 13% own more than 30 pairs of non-athletic shoes

– 1 in 12 own 100 or more pairs

– 1 in 7 admit hiding at least one shoe purchase from their spouse.

– 60% say they are willing to tolerate pain for fashion

– 42% worldwide go out at least two evenings each month in shoes that they know will hurt their feet

– 40% own shoes that they know they can’t walk in, but they wear them anyway

– 59% have blisters because of shoes

– 35% had an evening ruined by uncomfortable shoes

– 24% have fallen because of their shoes

– Women buy on average 3 pairs a year, and spend $49 a pair. 

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

African American Women Demographic: SurveyStud

African American women are the head of 29% of all African American households which is more than twice the rate for ‘all women’ at 13%. These are households defined by the U.S. Census Bureau as having a female head and no spouse present.

Only 33% of African American women who gave birth were married which is almost the opposite for ‘all women’ at 64%.

These additional responsibilities may also explain why African American women are slightly over-represented in the workforce compared to all women and even higher than African American men (67%).

Even though African American women are over-represented in the workforce they still have a higher unemployment rate than ‘all women’, 6% to 10% respectively. All of these factors help explain the higher poverty rate for African American women (29%) than ‘all women’ at 17%.

African American women ages 16 to 64 had a higher participation rate in the labor force (71%) compared to ‘all females’ (69%.) Labor force participation refers to the percent of women who were either working or looking for work. Women not in the labor force include those who may be full time students, disabled, and others who are not looking or gave up looking for employment for other reasons.

36% of African American women who worked full time all year in 2015 had median earnings of $33,780 compared to $38,097 for ‘all women.’– ages 16 to 64 years old, 25% had no earnings in 2015 which was higher than the 26% with no earnings of ‘all females’ in the same age group. Also a larger percentage of African American women 16 to 64 were unemployed than for ‘all females’ (9.6% compared to 5.8%) and were living below the poverty level (29%) than ‘all females’ (17%).

Compared to ‘all women’ in the United States African American women who worked were less likely to work in occupations that may be considered white collar and were much more likely to hold service jobs. Only 64% of working African American women held white collar jobs compared to 72% of ‘all women.’ For the purpose of the above table white collar occupations include but are not limited to jobs in management, business, computers, office, legal, education, etc.

Source: Contact for information

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

10 Surprising Statistics on Women in the Workplace: SurveyStud

Take a moment to read through these ten eye-opening stats to see where women really are in the working world and get some inspiration to see where changes need to be made and where advancements can be lauded for this generation and the next.

1. Women comprise 46% of the total U.S. labor force. With almost half of the workforce being women, female employees aren’t exactly a rarity. For most women today, getting a job is an expected part of life. This is a big change from past decades. In 1900, fewer than 20% of women participated in the labor market while today the number is around 75% and growing.

2. Women make only 77.5 cents for every dollar that men earn. This figure comes from data on the 2010 census. Despite this gap, many economists feel that the gap between pay for men and women is due to different personal choices men and women make about personal fulfillment, child rearing and hours at work. Whichever you choose to believe, the reality is that the gap is slowly but surely closing as women become increasingly educated and dual income families become the norm, but this isn’t much consolation to those who feel discriminated against today.

3. The more education a woman has, the greater the disparity in her wages. This certainly doesn’t mean women should shy away from professional positions, but they should be aware that they may have to battle harder for equal pay. Women in professional specialty occupations were found to earn just 72.7% of what men in the same position earned, and women in upper level executive, administrative and managerial occupations earned even less at 72.3%. If you compare this against the average of 77.5%, the numbers speak for themselves, and this graphic from the New York Times makes it even easier to see.

4. Women may work longer to receive the promotions that provide access to higher pay. One example provided by the National Center for Education Statistics shows that women often have to work three years longer in a teaching position to be promoted to a principal than their male counterparts. Some studies suggest that this is because women and men adapt different strategies when it comes to management and pursuing promotions, yet other studies connect it less to work and more to gender-based biases.

5. Women business owners employ 35% more people than all the Fortune 500 companies combined. If you’re like most people, you don’t picture a woman when you think about a business owner. Yet there are about 9.1 million women-owned businesses in the U.S., a number that comprises nearly 40% of all businesses. The idea that women don’t make good managers just doesn’t hold up when you look at these kinds of numbers, with women managing a large number of employees and making healthy profits while doing so.

6. Women account for 46% of the labor force, but 59% of workers making less than $8 an hour. What does it mean? It means that many women are taking on jobs that pay well under a living wage. With nearly 16% of U.S. households having women who are divorced, widowed or never married as the sole providers, this leaves many women at a distinct disadvantage and struggling to make ends meet as they dominate jobs in low paying fields.

7. Only 53% of employers provide at least some replacement pay during periods of maternity leave. Despite the fact that the arrival of a child means extra bills and expenses, many employers don’t provide women with any benefits if they to leave work temporarily to have a child. While there is no law requiring companies to offer paid maternity leave, considering it is an issue that primarily affects women, it’s certainly a blow to their income potential and ability to care for their families and themselves.

8. Four in ten businesses worldwide have no women in senior management. This shouldn’t be a surprise given the way many countries feel about women in the workplace. Here in the United States, however, women still feel the stress of trying to break into upper management, with 93% of the 439 senior women executives surveyed by Korn/Ferry International in 1992 feeling that a glass ceiling for women still existed. Yet new studies report that women outnumber men as managers in fields like human resources, health administration and education–perhaps stemming from reports that many businesses have seen a direct financial impact from hiring women.

9. Women earned less than men in 99% of all occupations. In virtually every field that women choose to enter, they can expect to earn less over their lifetime than their male counterparts. This means that over 47 years of full-time work, this gap amounts to an estimated loss in wages for women of $700,000 for high school graduates, $1.2 million for college grads, and $2 million for professional school grads–a staggering amount.

10. Minority women fare the worst when it comes to equal pay.
African-American women earn 64 cents to every dollar earned by white men and Hispanic women just 52 cents per dollar. Whether it’s attitudes about race or gender that are at play, it’s clear that something needs to be done to level the playing field.

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Breast Cancer Stats 2016: SurveyStud

In 2016, an estimated 246,660 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in women in the U.S., along with 61,000 new cases of non-invasive (in situ) breast cancer.

1 in 8 or 12% of U.S. women will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime.

About 2,600 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in men in 2016. A man’s lifetime risk of breast cancer is about 1 in 1,000.

Breast cancer incidence rates in the U.S. began decreasing in the year 2000, after increasing for the previous two decades. They dropped by 7% from 2002 to 2003 alone. One theory is that this decrease was partially due to the reduced use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) by women after the results of a large study called the Women’s Health Initiative were published in 2002. These results suggested a connection between HRT and increased breast cancer risk.

About 40,450 women in the U.S. are expected to die in 2016 from breast cancer, though death rates have been decreasing since 1989. Women under 50 have experienced larger decreases. These decreases are thought to be the result of treatment advances, earlier detection through screening, and increased awareness.

For women in the U.S., breast cancer death rates are higher than those for any other cancer, besides lung cancer.

Besides skin cancer, breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among American women. In 2016, it’s estimated that just under 30% of newly diagnosed cancers in women will be breast cancers.

In women under 45, breast cancer is more common in African-American women than white women. Overall, African-American women are more likely to die of breast cancer. For Asian, Hispanic, and Native-American women, the risk of developing and dying from breast cancer is lower.

In 2016, there are more than 2.8 million women with a history of breast cancer in the U.S. This includes women currently being treated and women who have finished treatment.

A woman’s risk of breast cancer nearly doubles if she has a first-degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) who has been diagnosed with breast cancer. Less than 15% of women who get breast cancer have a family member diagnosed with it.

About 5-10% of breast cancers can be linked to gene mutations (abnormal changes) inherited from one’s mother or father. Mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are the most common. On average, women with a BRCA1 mutation have a 55-65% lifetime risk of developing breast cancer. For women with a BRCA2 mutation, the risk is 45%. Breast cancer that is positive for the BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations tends to develop more often in younger women. An increased ovarian cancer risk is also associated with these genetic mutations. In men, BRCA2 mutations are associated with a lifetime breast cancer risk of about 6.8%; BRCA1 mutations are a less frequent cause of breast cancer in men.

About 85% of breast cancers occur in women who have no family history of breast cancer. These occur due to genetic mutations that happen as a result of the aging process and life in general, rather than inherited mutations.

The most significant risk factors for breast cancer are gender (being a woman) and age (growing older).

Source: BreastCancer.org

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i