Female Ejaculation: My Experience

When I discovered I could orgasm I wondered how I’d lived the first 16 years of my life without it.

When I discovered I could orgasm with a man I was truly excited but unfortunately for men that didn’t happen until I was nearly 20. A rabbit helped me find and orgasm before a man did, good for the rabbit, he’s still in employment from time to time, bad for the men I dated who no longer get to enjoy the privilege of having sex with me, and it is a privilege.🙂

However when I first found out I could actually explode and ejaculate and do it all with my own fingers I wondered if I would ever need another man in my life!

You see I’d been reading one of those trashy women’s well being websites and for some reason when I saw the link to “Make her cum” I clicked it. I started out reading with only a half interest but by the time I got 4 paragraphs in the author was describing that it’s not only possible for some women to cum but to cum with such force that it puts a man’s orgasm to shame, not only that the enjoyment of cumming is often followed by the enjoyment of orgasm.

I was somewhat skeptical, maybe naive, I’d of course heard women talk about cumming, some even talk about ‘squirting’ but I actually thought the idea of ejaculation in women was a myth. Obviously I just hadn’t been with the right guys. Hello Rabbit!
Apparently some women can’t do it, apparently some, like me, just hadn’t learnt how to do it. So here’s my method, a method I have honed over the last 10 years since I first started doing it, maybe you could try it yourself.

————

Alone at last, my husband had finally gone to work, I thought he’d never leave. Afternoon shift was always a killer, I wanted him to hang around, to be with him, but some days I was just horny as hell for my own fun. Don’t get me wrong I love my husband and love having sex with him but he’s never been able to give me the pleasure I can give myself, maybe it’s a sub-conscious thing where I wont let him do it because it’s my secret, I’m not sure but I do love my ‘alone’ time.

Hearing his car drive out the driveway I went straight to the bathroom, firstly to relieve myself because it helps with what I had planned, secondly to get my rabbit. Several minutes later I was laying on the bed completely naked, I didn’t need any video simulation, my mind worked well enough.

I started out rubbing the vibrating rabbit against my clit, small gently circles around and around until I could feel myself getting wet. I then slowly moved the circling head up and down my moistening lips, rubbing it between the folds of skin. I started out with gentle pressure sliding the toy up and down, circling my pussy entrance but not entering it then slowly dragging the thing back up to my clit and repeating with just a little more pressure on each of the sensitive parts.

Closing my eyes I began thinking of this guy at the grocery store, I’m not sure why he did it for me but he nearly always got my heart started, by the time I was finished I wouldn’t need to be thinking about anyone.

I rubbed and slid that vibrating toy up and down for several minutes, enjoying the tingling sensations it was sending through my groin. When I finally inserted the rabbit into my waiting and desperate vagina I moaned, a little louder than I expected but with no one else home it didn’t matter.

The circular motion of the rabbit rubbing against my inner vagina was driving me insane. I began sliding the big red rabbit out of me then thrusting my hips toward it driving it inside me. I changed speeds and made him work faster. Thrust after thrust I moaned and relished the feeling in my wet vagina.

I only lasted a few minutes with the rabbit doing his magic before it was time to make my own magic. Turning my lively little friend off I pulled him out and dropped him on the bed beside me to give him a well deserved rest and took matters into my own hands.

Inserting two fingers into myself was pleasurable, feeling both fingers move separately, each rubbing a different area had me breathing fast again within seconds. I was so wet, so excited and so turned on I knew I wasn’t going to last much longer so I turned my attention to what I’d really been hanging out for.

I gently pushed my two fingers up against my g-spot, (yes it’s there for you unbelieving men) and applied gentle pressure. With both fingers I pushed and rubbed, pushed and rubbed, then immediately pulled them away. Less than a second later I repeated the move, then again, and again. Each time applying a little more pressure to my g-spot, rubbing harder and pushing harder. At the same time I used my left hand to squeeze and rub my swollen clit.

Knowing the exact target helped and it took me very little time to work myself up into a state I could not return from. Seconds later with my fingers gently pushed against my g-spot I came. I exploded, I squirted, all over my fingers and right hand and all over the bed sheets. Unlike the male orgasm which is explode and it’s all over for me I explode then orgasm.

I came solidly for nearly 20 seconds at which time I began orgasming. I held my fingers firmly against my g-spot applying pressure and moving my vagina muscles. Gently pinching my clit I then clamped my legs and rode out the movements of my fingers inside me. My orgasm was loud, rocked me on the bed and left me breathless.

When I finally removed my fingers I was sitting in a wet spot that would make most men jealous. I knew my future had me changing the bed sheets before my husband got home at midnight but my immediate future was all about recovery and regaining my breath!

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Advertisements

High-Heels and Pain

“… After one hour, six minutes and 48 seconds heels start to hurt”

You can’t handle feet for a living without encountering some of the unfortunate side effects of wearing high heels — like foot pain, corns, and calluses. We (SurveyStud) surveyed 503 women about their high-heel habits, and the results are:

• 72% of women wear high-heeled shoes (39% wear heels daily, while 33% wear them less often)

• 59% report toe pain as a result of wearing uncomfortable shoes; 54% report pain in the ball of the foot

• 58% of women purchased new high-heeled shoes in the last year

• Women who wear high heels daily tend to be younger and are more likely to wear uncomfortable shoes

• Younger women are more likely to experience blisters and pain in the arches of their feet than older women. Older women are more likely to experience corns, calluses, and bunions

Why women wear high heels:

• 82%  for fashion or style
• 73%  to complete professional attire
• 54%  to look sexier and more attractive
• 48%  to enhance their legs
• 39%  to appear taller

Even after pressing these facts to our surveyed population 71% said they will continue to wear 👠.

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Women NOT respected in Football.

…female NFL viewership has grew by 27%, much higher than the 18% growth for men. Yet when it comes to the “female” football league, women wear “bikinis,” as an uniform. Lets look at the numbers which suggest a need for change:

1. 45% of the NFL’s more than 150 million American fans are women

2. 35% of NFL regular-season games are viewed by woman

3. 43% of NFL games are attended by women

4. Regular-Season female viewership is up 27%

5. Superbowl Sunday female viewership is up 15%

6. Sunday Night female viewership is up 25%

7. Thursday Night female viewership is up 32%

8. 85% of licensed NFL merchandise purchasing is by woman

9. Since 2004, the number of adult women watching NFL games on ESPN has increased 60% — higher than the 47% ratings gains NFL games have experienced on ESPN during that time.

… the numbers indicate women are serious about the sport–so why are “we” not up in arms about the way women are sexualized in the female league?

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Women & Online Dating Stats: SurveyStud

– If you are a woman, you have 15 minutes to make a first impression on a man

– 43% of women have Googled someone on the internet before a first date

– 53% of women find a great smile the most attractive feature

– 80% of men date women that are at least 5 years younger than them

– 76% of women date men that are at least 5 years older than them

– 52% of women feel they are too busy to meet other singles

– 60% of women and 64% of men don’t talk about politics on a first date

– 88% of women find money to be very important in a relationship

– 17% chance of liking a date set up by a friend

– 48% of breakups in online relationships occur thru email

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Single Mother Stats: SurveyStud

Once largely limited to poor women and minorities, single motherhood is now becoming the new “social-norm.”

This prevalence is due in part to the growing trend of children born outside marriage — a societal trend that was virtually unheard of decades ago.

About 4 of 10 or 40% of children were born to unwed mothers. Nearly two-thirds are born to mothers under the age of 30.2

Of all single-parent families in the U.S., single mothers make up the majority.

According to U.S. Census Bureau, out of 12 million single parent families in 2015, more than 80% were headed by single mothers.

Today 1 in 4 or 25% of children under the age of 18 — a total of about 17.4 million — are being raised without a father and nearly half (45%) live below the poverty line.

For those living with father, about 21% live in poverty. In contrast, among children living with both parents, 13% are counted as poor.

STATISTICS OF SINGLE PARENT FAMILIES * (2015)

– 84% Single Mom Family
– 16% Single Dad Family

DEMOGRAPHICS

– Around 49% of single mothers have never married

– 51% are either divorced, separated or widowed. Half have one child, 30% have two.

– About two thirds are White, one third Black, one quarter Hispanic. One third have a college degree, while one sixth have not completed high school.

EMPLOYMENT

two thirds of single mothers are working outside the home, a slightly greater share than the share of married mothers who are also working outside the home.

However, only half are employed full-time all year long, a quarter (23.2%) are jobless the entire year. Among those who were laid off or looking for work, less than a quarter (22.4%) received unemployment benefits.

If a single mother is able to work, her earning power still lags significantly compared with men’s, about 78¢ to a $1 for the same job — leaving a wage gap of 23 cents on the dollar.

The wage disparities are even greater for women of color — African-American women earn only 64¢, while Hispanic and Latinas fare worse, being paid just 56¢ on the dollar.

INCOME

Single mothers earn income that place them well below married mothers in the income ladder. The gap between the two groups is significantly large.

The median income for families led by a single mother in 2015 was about $26,000, one third (⅓) the median for married couple families ($84,000.) Nearly half with an annual income of less than $25,000.

Source: Contact us for information

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

10 Surprising Statistics on Women in the Workplace: SurveyStud

Take a moment to read through these ten eye-opening stats to see where women really are in the working world and get some inspiration to see where changes need to be made and where advancements can be lauded for this generation and the next.

1. Women comprise 46% of the total U.S. labor force. With almost half of the workforce being women, female employees aren’t exactly a rarity. For most women today, getting a job is an expected part of life. This is a big change from past decades. In 1900, fewer than 20% of women participated in the labor market while today the number is around 75% and growing.

2. Women make only 77.5 cents for every dollar that men earn. This figure comes from data on the 2010 census. Despite this gap, many economists feel that the gap between pay for men and women is due to different personal choices men and women make about personal fulfillment, child rearing and hours at work. Whichever you choose to believe, the reality is that the gap is slowly but surely closing as women become increasingly educated and dual income families become the norm, but this isn’t much consolation to those who feel discriminated against today.

3. The more education a woman has, the greater the disparity in her wages. This certainly doesn’t mean women should shy away from professional positions, but they should be aware that they may have to battle harder for equal pay. Women in professional specialty occupations were found to earn just 72.7% of what men in the same position earned, and women in upper level executive, administrative and managerial occupations earned even less at 72.3%. If you compare this against the average of 77.5%, the numbers speak for themselves, and this graphic from the New York Times makes it even easier to see.

4. Women may work longer to receive the promotions that provide access to higher pay. One example provided by the National Center for Education Statistics shows that women often have to work three years longer in a teaching position to be promoted to a principal than their male counterparts. Some studies suggest that this is because women and men adapt different strategies when it comes to management and pursuing promotions, yet other studies connect it less to work and more to gender-based biases.

5. Women business owners employ 35% more people than all the Fortune 500 companies combined. If you’re like most people, you don’t picture a woman when you think about a business owner. Yet there are about 9.1 million women-owned businesses in the U.S., a number that comprises nearly 40% of all businesses. The idea that women don’t make good managers just doesn’t hold up when you look at these kinds of numbers, with women managing a large number of employees and making healthy profits while doing so.

6. Women account for 46% of the labor force, but 59% of workers making less than $8 an hour. What does it mean? It means that many women are taking on jobs that pay well under a living wage. With nearly 16% of U.S. households having women who are divorced, widowed or never married as the sole providers, this leaves many women at a distinct disadvantage and struggling to make ends meet as they dominate jobs in low paying fields.

7. Only 53% of employers provide at least some replacement pay during periods of maternity leave. Despite the fact that the arrival of a child means extra bills and expenses, many employers don’t provide women with any benefits if they to leave work temporarily to have a child. While there is no law requiring companies to offer paid maternity leave, considering it is an issue that primarily affects women, it’s certainly a blow to their income potential and ability to care for their families and themselves.

8. Four in ten businesses worldwide have no women in senior management. This shouldn’t be a surprise given the way many countries feel about women in the workplace. Here in the United States, however, women still feel the stress of trying to break into upper management, with 93% of the 439 senior women executives surveyed by Korn/Ferry International in 1992 feeling that a glass ceiling for women still existed. Yet new studies report that women outnumber men as managers in fields like human resources, health administration and education–perhaps stemming from reports that many businesses have seen a direct financial impact from hiring women.

9. Women earned less than men in 99% of all occupations. In virtually every field that women choose to enter, they can expect to earn less over their lifetime than their male counterparts. This means that over 47 years of full-time work, this gap amounts to an estimated loss in wages for women of $700,000 for high school graduates, $1.2 million for college grads, and $2 million for professional school grads–a staggering amount.

10. Minority women fare the worst when it comes to equal pay.
African-American women earn 64 cents to every dollar earned by white men and Hispanic women just 52 cents per dollar. Whether it’s attitudes about race or gender that are at play, it’s clear that something needs to be done to level the playing field.

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Breast Cancer Stats 2016: SurveyStud

In 2016, an estimated 246,660 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in women in the U.S., along with 61,000 new cases of non-invasive (in situ) breast cancer.

1 in 8 or 12% of U.S. women will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime.

About 2,600 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in men in 2016. A man’s lifetime risk of breast cancer is about 1 in 1,000.

Breast cancer incidence rates in the U.S. began decreasing in the year 2000, after increasing for the previous two decades. They dropped by 7% from 2002 to 2003 alone. One theory is that this decrease was partially due to the reduced use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) by women after the results of a large study called the Women’s Health Initiative were published in 2002. These results suggested a connection between HRT and increased breast cancer risk.

About 40,450 women in the U.S. are expected to die in 2016 from breast cancer, though death rates have been decreasing since 1989. Women under 50 have experienced larger decreases. These decreases are thought to be the result of treatment advances, earlier detection through screening, and increased awareness.

For women in the U.S., breast cancer death rates are higher than those for any other cancer, besides lung cancer.

Besides skin cancer, breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among American women. In 2016, it’s estimated that just under 30% of newly diagnosed cancers in women will be breast cancers.

In women under 45, breast cancer is more common in African-American women than white women. Overall, African-American women are more likely to die of breast cancer. For Asian, Hispanic, and Native-American women, the risk of developing and dying from breast cancer is lower.

In 2016, there are more than 2.8 million women with a history of breast cancer in the U.S. This includes women currently being treated and women who have finished treatment.

A woman’s risk of breast cancer nearly doubles if she has a first-degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) who has been diagnosed with breast cancer. Less than 15% of women who get breast cancer have a family member diagnosed with it.

About 5-10% of breast cancers can be linked to gene mutations (abnormal changes) inherited from one’s mother or father. Mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are the most common. On average, women with a BRCA1 mutation have a 55-65% lifetime risk of developing breast cancer. For women with a BRCA2 mutation, the risk is 45%. Breast cancer that is positive for the BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations tends to develop more often in younger women. An increased ovarian cancer risk is also associated with these genetic mutations. In men, BRCA2 mutations are associated with a lifetime breast cancer risk of about 6.8%; BRCA1 mutations are a less frequent cause of breast cancer in men.

About 85% of breast cancers occur in women who have no family history of breast cancer. These occur due to genetic mutations that happen as a result of the aging process and life in general, rather than inherited mutations.

The most significant risk factors for breast cancer are gender (being a woman) and age (growing older).

Source: BreastCancer.org

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Single Mom-Family Stats: SurveyStud

Who are single moms today? These single mom statistics might surprise you:

There are 10 million single mother-lead families in the United States (Census). 3x the number in 1960.

– 25% of families are headed by single moms. (Pew).

– 40% of babies born in the United States are born to single mothers. (Pew)
 
Millennial single mom statistics

– 57% of babies born to millennials were out of wedlock. (John’s Hopkins)

– 64% of millennial moms reported at least one birth out of wedlock. (John’s Hopkins)

More educated millennials are having babies outside of marriage. Of millennial moms who have babies outside of marriage:

– 67% have some college education, and 32% have four or more years of higher education. (John’s Hopkins)

Older single mom statistics

– 48% jump in births to unmarried women age 35-39 (CDC)

– 29% jump in births to unmarried moms aged 40-44 (CDC)

While the rate of babies born to single mothers has declined slightly, there is a notable rise in babies born to single moms by choice – women who tend to be older, more educated, higher income. (CDC)

Single moms’ education and income:

– 58% of single moms have attended college or have at least a bachelor’s degree (Pew)
Of millennial moms who have babies outside of marriage

– 67% have some college education, and 32% have four or more years of higher education. (John’s Hopkins)

– 32% earn $40,000+ (Census)

– 10% earn $80,000+ (Census)

Single moms are overwhelmingly doing it all alone:

– 51% of custodial parents have child support agreements (informal or formal), but only 41% received all child support owed. (Census)

– Of fathers who live apart from their children, only 22% of dads see their kids more than once per week. (Pew)

What is driving single mom trends?

There are 1.2 million divorces in the United States each year. (Census)

Traditional nuclear families with two married heterosexual parents are now the minority of U.S.

The rise of single motherhood is the largest influence on this trend — followed by gay families, multigenerational families and . (Pew)

– 46% millennials and 44% GenXers say “Marriage is becoming obsolete.” (Pew)

Working vs Non-Working Mom: SurveyStud

Key Mom Stats:

2 billion in the World (82.5 million in the U.S.)

First-time Moms: Average age of new moms is 25, vs. 21 in 1970

Kids: Modern moms average 2 kids (1950s: 3.5 kids; 1700s: 7-10 kids)

4.3 babies are born each second

Working Moms

72% of moms with children over 1 year old work (about the same as childless women) , vs. 39% in 1976

55% of moms with a child under 1 year old work, vs. 31% in 1976

Moms with a full-time job spend 13 hours working at the office or at home on family chores

Baby Chores

Diaper Changes: 7,300 by baby’s 2nd birthday

Diaper Changing Speed: Moms take 2 minutes, 5 seconds (adds up to 3 40-hour work weeks each year!) , vs. 1 minute, 36 seconds for dads

Giving Attention: Preschooler requires mom’s attention once every 4 minutes or 210 times / day

Taking Care: Preschooler moms spend 2.7 hrs / day on primary childcare, vs. 1.2 hours for dads

Household Chores

Chores: Women average 2.2 hrs / day, vs. 1.3 hrs / day for men

Laundry: 88% is done by moms, totaling 330 loads of laundry & 5,300 articles of clothing each year

Least Favorite Chore: Vacuuming the stairs
Bathroom Multi-Tasking for Moms: Reading is the most common activity, followed by talking on the phone, meditating, watching TV, drinking coffee, eating and balancing the checkbook

Misc Mommy & Baby Facts

Most popular birth month: July

Most popular birth day: Tuesday

Most popular birthday: October 5

30 Pounds: Average weight gain during pregnancy

Baby Gender Gap: 105 boys born for every 100 girls

First Year Baby Costs: $7,000 of baby items before 1st birthday

Cost of Raising a Child: Middle-income families spend $242,070 to raise a kid to 18 (not incl. college!)

Most Popular Names of 21st Century

Baby Girls: Emily, Madison, Hannah

Baby Boys: Jacob, Michael, Joshua

Research suggests that moms who give birth later in life, live longer

Source: Statistica

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Setbacks: SurveyStud

When bad things happen, it’s easy to feel like a victim. Circumstances can feel out of control, and many of them actually are. But asking this question forces you to accept whatever has happened and to shift your mentality towards harnessing it in a constructive manner. While this is empowering, it may take a long time before you’re ready to ask what you can create from it.

I don’t want to sugarcoat this. So rather than immediately asking this question, I recommend looking at a four-step process. For minor setbacks this process may be fast, for major ones it may be long — there’s no “right” timeline. 

1. Accept whatever has happened: The first step is to accept whatever has happened. Acceptance may seem as simple as saying “well that happened,” but often we need to go through other phases to get there. It may look a bit like the Kubler-Ross stages of grief: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and finally, acceptance.

2. Give yourself time and space to recover: When Steve Jobs got fired, he admitted that he “really didn’t know what to do for a few months. I felt that I had let the previous generation of entrepreneurs down, that I had dropped the baton as it was being passed to me.”

Like Jobs, most of us need time to process our setbacks and “land” from them before we can think about creating from them. Stuffing your emotions may seem helpful in the short run, but it will ultimately hold you back. Instead, be compassionate with yourself and allow yourself space to heal or grieve. Go through it, not around it. Acceptance and recovery takes time. 

3. Get in the right frame of mind: As you recover, now is a good time to start rejuvenating yourself physically, emotionally and spiritually. Take small steps that help you get into the right frame of mind. Go to yoga or kickboxing class. Pray. Read a new book. Don’t worry so much about the future; just do what you need to do to regain your positive energy.

4. Ask the question: Once you’ve taken the above steps and are feeling a strong sense of self again, now is the time to ask the magic question: What can I create from this? Try brainstorming all of the different ways your setback could become the best thing that ever happened to you. It may be hard at first, but eventually you will turn a corner start begin brimming with possibility.