Saggy Breasts

As a 20 something I would have never thought saggy boobs represent some sort of canonistic experience for women of all ages regardless of social-economics, and or demographics. See unless you saw me naked, you would never guess I have saggy boobs. Yes I said it. I have saggy boobs.

It’s like one morning I woke up, rolled on my back and my boobs just didn’t follow with the rest of my body. I’m not kidding, when I lie down, 80 percent of my breasts fall into my armpit. It’s really cute.

At the ripe age of 23, they’re completely deflated. I thought boob sag would only come after pregnancy, but I was wrong. Gravity is a law. My body has abided.

Sometimes I wonder what I did to gravity to deserve this boob sag. Sometimes I’ll lift them up, look in the mirror and gawk at how much of my body they cover up. My upper ribs are constantly in the shadow of my under-boob.

When I hit puberty, my ta-tas were a size D. I even had stretch marks in high school because my chest was #blessed. But at around age 20, my overwhelming D-cups deflated to modest C-cups.

Another thing I noticed my boob sag is my biggest insecurity when it comes to hooking up. They look great when they’re tucked up into a bra, but once that comes off, they’re just going to flop out. It’s like opening a bag of chips only to find more air than chips.

Then there’s the gym… OMG!!! Has anyone else gone to the gym, attempted to do some crunches and all of the sudden notice half your boob is leaking out the side of your sports bra? Just me? OK.

If you have saggy boobs, sports bras work their magic by reinforcing everything, but your boobs just get flattened against your chest in the most unflattering way. They do this droopy, separation thing as you run on the treadmill. It’s just not cute.

No matter what bra cup size you have, you probably struggle to find bathing suits that fit well. I laugh when I look at string bikinis because they’re just something I’ll never be able to wear. Ever since I grew these damn things, bikini tops have been my worst enemy. Either I’m busting out of them, forming an attractive quad boob (when they spill out the top) or there’s no support whatsoever. That’s when I contemplate just avoiding beaches altogether.

My cleavage used to be difficult to cover up. Now, I can only create Victoria’s Secret-worthy cleavage when there’s a gravity-defying push-up bra involved.

So I wrote all of this to say, you are not the only woman to deal with boob sag.

Question: Have you ever experienced boob sag?

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SurveyStud: In the App Store

Queef 

Some feminists like to say that acceptance of female body hair is the final taboo — the final frontier of body shaming if you will. Well, I take your armpit hair and raise you a queef.

A queef is the sound a vagina makes when it sucks in a bunch of air for no reason, and then blows it back out. This sound is loud, disruptive, and often vibrates. Unlike farts, queefs are irrepressible.

While I can hold in a fart until I want to throw up, I cannot suppress a queef. No vagina-baring woman can. In fact, like fairies, queefs almost always make an appearance when you least expect them to – after standing up too quickly, while inverted at any point during a yoga class, or (my favorite), during and after sex.

Whenever I queef a few thoughts run through my head like, “FUCK!!!” or “NO!!!” and maybe, “NOT AGAIN!!”

Vaginas are beautiful flowers and vessels of joy, so it only makes sense that they should possess some glaring flaw. I get it… but does it really have to be the curse of the queef? It freaks me out that vaginas make such a ratchet noise.

Even a gross heathen like myself feels completely mortified, horrified, disturbed, and betrayed when their vagina sounds off like a foghorn without permission. I can’t help but think that post-sex queefs are equivalent to my vagina shaming me, smugly scolding, “PPPFFTT!!! Yeah, that’s what you get you whore.”

I’m still trying to figure out whether it’s best to acknowledge a sex queef when it happens, or to ignore it. I texted a few of my friends to share their queef experiences with me (lol at boundaries), and to confess whether or not they gave a crap.

Basically what I learned is the softest sex can cause an air raid. The sound is always so aggressive and unnecessary no matter what. It’s like okay, we get it. We heard it.

Occasionally a random article will pop up in my Facebook feed titled “Weird Things That Happen During Sex” or something stupid, and queefs always rank among the list. The subsequent advice is always to laugh it off and make a joke about it because body positivity, blah blah whatever.

Question: What do you say when a queef happens during sex?

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SurveyStud: In the App Store

When You simply… exist

In a relationship, it’s easy to fall into a pattern. And I’m not saying there’s something wrong with routine. It’s really quite lovely to be with someone who makes you feel so secure that you can go through life unfazed by the bullsh*t.

But you have to be careful in love. Sometimes, you can confuse being comfortable with being happy.

All too often, we find ourselves in long-term relationships that don’t excite us. We stay because we’re terrified of the alternative, but we don’t have the energy to start something new.

Our everyday routines make us complacent and satisfied, and it’s too late before we realize what’s happening.

After months, years and perhaps even decades, you wake up beside your partner and don’t even know how you ended up there.

Though the differences between “happy” and “comfortable” can be slight, they’re very real.

Being happy means butterflies; being comfortable means complacency.

When you’re happy, you’re in a state of euphoria. And “euphoria” doesn’t mean unrealistic romantic bliss. It just means your stomach flips every time you see your lover. There’s a spark and an excitement that doesn’t die down, because that’s how happy you are.

But when you’re comfortable, you go with things. You don’t question it. You’re not affected by your partner’s presence. You’re checked out.

You’re not precisely unhappy, but you’re not joyous, either. You simply… exist.

But if you “simply exist” for too long, you’ll find yourself completely suffocated.

Think I will stop here because this is making me feel very sad… I just wiped a tear off my iphone screen–I’m really talking about myself. Dang.

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What If I Had…

Sometimes I wonder if my life would be different had I made different choices. Would I be an intern with SurveyStud, Inc? Would I have a fabulous gay BFF and dominate the Houston Hipster scene? Would I have a purple dildo named Willie Nelson (Dont judge, I’m baring my soul.)

These questions linger in my mind from time to time. I watch SNL and the scurrying of the production crew reminds me of the production assistant job I was offered at 21. I recall a meeting with my new boss, Nola, and her team. The responsibility, the long work hours, the poor pay, the possibility of living a life I wasn’t sure I wanted: it was all too much for me. Nola never saw or heard from me again.

My gay BFF would have been a product of living in Houston. I often daydreamed of riding in a red convertible, top down, EMD (Eletronic Dance Music) blasting. The wind whipping my hair as if I’d pushed Beyonce out of the way and became the star of her video. The base of the beats pouring from the speakers, turning heads. But these daydreams never became reality.

After living in South Jersey for 2 years, uprooting my life and leaving my family behind once again became unfathomable. My gay BFF and I never had a chance.

As for my lost college love, I see his life playing out on Facebook and think of the choice I made my Freshman year. It was Bad Boy Justin over kind Erik, and I chose wrong. Or so I think. Sure, I wonder what could have been, especially now that I am single, 23, and ready for love and commitment. I ponder my life with Erik when I peruse the photos of his daughter, and think, how beautiful our children would be. But don’t we all reminisce when it comes to matters of the heart? Yes, we do. And could a different path have been better? Perhaps.

The only thing that is certain is that there are no guarantees. My choices, whether regretful or not, have led me to where and who I am today. They’ve taught me lessons I never even knew existed, which is why I am grateful for my path, even if I abandoned Nola, never bedazzled jeans with my gay BFF, and broke Erik’s heart.

Now, I choose to live in the present moment. I choose to leave the ‘what ifs’ and ‘shoulda, woulda, coulda’s’ in this blog and move forward with certainty that I am where I’m supposed to be. It is the best choice I’ve made thus far and I’m sticking to it.

Question: Do you ever think about what if?

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SurveyStud: In the App Store

Feeling Lonely

When it comes to relationships, maybe we’re all in glass houses, and shouldn’t throw stones. Because you can never really know. Some people are settling down, some are settling and some people refuse to settle for anything less than Butterflies.

There was a time when being single meant nobody wanted you. Now it means you’re pretty sexy and you’re taking your time deciding how you want your life to be and who you want to spend it with.

I mean I’ve done the merry go round. I’ve been through the revolving door. There were times when I felt like I met somebody I could stand still with and… ha, that’s my inner voice, but then reality kicks in, and I revert back to my last paragraph, “being single means I’m taking my time deciding how / who I want in my life.”

Often I’m mentality yelling how lonely I am everytime I see happy couples, or my friends getting married–truth is it hurts! Me this 20 something educated successful woman (Dont judge Im baring my soul.)

You know I feel like, somewhere out there is someone who will love, understand, and kiss… wait thats my inner voice again.

They say there is someone for everyone on this planet–I bet the person for me died at birth. Oh well… any who let me stop.

Question: How often do you feel lonely?

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SurveyStud: In the App Store

Am I Petty…

There’s no class in high school on how to not be a shitty boyfriend or girlfriend. Sure, they teach us the biology of sex, the legality of marriage, and maybe we read a few obscure love stories from the 19th century on how not to be.

But when it comes down to actually handling the nitty-gritty of relationships, we’re given no pointers… or worse, we’re given advice columns in women’s magazines or this blogg. Yes, it’s trial-and-error from the get-go. And if you’re like most people, it’s been mostly error.

But part of the problem is that many unhealthy relationship habits are baked into our culture. We worship romantic love — you know, that dizzying and irrational romantic love that somehow finds breaking china plates on the wall in a fit of tears somewhat endearing — and scoff at practicality or unconventional sexualities.

Men and women are raised to objectify each other and to objectify their relationships. Thus, our partners are often seen as assets rather than someone to share mutual emotional support.

A lot of the self-help literature out there isn’t helpful either (no, men and women are not from different planets, you over-generalizing prick.) And for most of us, mom and dad surely weren’t the best examples either.

Fortunately, there’s been a lot of psychological research into healthy and happy relationships the past few decades and there are some general principles that keep popping up consistently that most people are unaware of or don’t follow. In fact, some of these principles actually go against what is traditionally considered “romantic” or normal in a relationship.

Below are tendencies (based on research from the folks at SurveyStud)in relationships that many couples think are healthy and normal, but are actually toxic and destroying everything you hold dear.

THE RELATIONSHIP SCORECARD. What It Is: The “keeping score” phenomenon is when someone you’re dating continues to blame you for past mistakes you made in the relationship. If both people in the relationship do this it devolves into what I call “the relationship scorecard,” where it becomes a battle to see who has screwed up the most over the months or years, and therefore who owes the other one more.

You were an asshole at Amy’s 28th birthday party back in 2010 and it has proceeded to ruin your life ever since. Why? Because there’s not a week that goes by that you’re not reminded of it. But that’s OK, because that time you caught her sending flirtatious text messages to her co-worker immediately removes her right to get jealous, so it’s kind of even, right?

Wrong.

Why It’s Toxic: The relationship scorecard develops over time because one or both people in a relationship use past wrongdoings in order to try and justify current righteousness. This is a double-whammy of suckage. Not only are you deflecting the current issue itself, but you’re ginning up guilt and bitterness from the past to manipulate your partner into feeling wrong in the present.

If this goes on long enough, both partners eventually spend most of their energy trying to prove that they’re less culpable than the other, rather than solving the current problem. People spend all of their time trying to be less wrong for each other instead of being more right for each other.

What You Should Do Instead: Deal with issues individually unless they are legitimately connected. If someone habitually cheats, then that’s obviously a recurring problem. But the fact that she embarrassed you in 2010 and now she got sad and ignored you today in 2013 have nothing to do with each other, so don’t bring it up.

You must recognize that by choosing to be with your significant other, you are choosing to be with all of their prior actions and behaviors. If you don’t accept those, then ultimately, you are not accepting them. If something bothered you that much a year ago, you should have dealt with it a year ago.

DROPPING “HINTS” AND OTHER PASSIVE-AGGRESSION. What It Is: Instead of stating a desire or thought overtly, your partner tries to nudge you in the right direction of figuring it out yourself. Instead of saying what’s actually upsetting you, you find small and petty ways to piss your partner off so you’ll then feel justified in complaining to them.

Why It’s Toxic: Because it shows that you two are not comfortable communicating openly and clearly with one another. A person has no reason to be passive-aggressive if they feel safe expressing any anger or insecurity within the relationship. A person will never feel a need to drop “hints” if they feel like they won’t be judged or criticized for it.

What You Should Do Instead: State your feelings and desires openly. And make it clear that the other person is not necessarily responsible or obligated to them but that you’d love to have their support. If they love you, they’ll almost always be able to give it.

BLAMING YOUR PARTNER FOR YOUR OWN EMOTIONS. What It Is: Let’s say you’re having a crappy day and your partner isn’t exactly being super sympathetic or supportive at the moment. They’ve been on the phone all day with some people from work. They got distracted when you hugged them. You want to lay around at home together and just watch a movie tonight, but they have plans to go out and see their friends.

So you lash out at them for being so insensitive and callous toward you. You’ve been having a shitty day and they have done nothing about it. Sure, you never asked, but they should just know to make you feel better. They should have gotten off the phone and ditched their plans based on your lousy emotional state.

Why It’s Toxic: Blaming our partners for our emotions is a subtle form of selfishness, and a classic example of the poor maintenance of personal boundaries. When you set a precedent that your partner is responsible for how you feel at all times (and vice-versa), you will develop codependent tendencies. Suddenly, they’re not allowed to plan activities without checking with you first. All activities at home — even the mundane ones like reading books or watching TV — must be negotiated and compromised. When someone begins to get upset, all personal desires go out the window because it is now your responsibility to make one another feel better.

The biggest problem of developing these codependent tendencies is that they breed resentment. Sure, if my girlfriend gets mad at me once because she’s had a shitty day and is frustrated and needs attention, that’s understandable. But if it becomes an expectation that my life revolves around her emotional well-being at all times, then I’m soon going to become very bitter and even manipulative towards her feelings and desires.

What You Should Do Instead: Take responsibility for your own emotions and expect your partner to be responsible for theirs. There’s a subtle yet important difference between being supportive of your partner and being obligated to your partner. Any sacrifices should be made as an autonomous choice and not seen as an expectation. As soon as both people in a relationship become culpable for each other’s moods and downswings, it gives them both incentives to hide their true feelings and manipulate one another.

Let me stop because my bath water is getting cold, and I realize Im really talking about myself. Am I petty?

Question: Are you petty?

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SurveyStud: In the App Store

When the condom breaks

Im not going to lie, this has happened to me a couple times–no thats not true, how about a few. Please dont judge me, Im baring my soul with hope I can help someone else. So yesterday evening was one of those Tinder moments, and the condom broke… WOAH, STOP, get from behind me!

See male condoms are one of the best forms of birth control out there because they’re cheap, you can buy them anywhere, they prevent pregnancy, and they also prevent the spread of STIs, but they only work if they don’t break! So to help you girls/guys, below are reasons why a condom might rip–again please dont judge me because Im stressed about this:

– Storage issues. Heat damages latex condoms, so they shouldn’t be kept in a hot place such as a glove compartment or a wallet. Keep them in your medicine cabinet or nightstand instead.

– Lack of lubrication. If there is friction while having sex, especially anal sex, not only will it cause pain and irritation to your privates, but the condom can also break. So be sure to use lubricated condoms or use extra lube if you need to.

– You’re using the wrong lubricant. If you’re using latex condoms, oil-based lubricants can weaken the rubber and cause a tear, so use only water-based lubes.

– The condom doesn’t fit. If the condom is too small or too large, it can rip, so experiment with different-sized condoms to get a snug fit — not too tight and not too loose.

– The woman is tight. Some women’s vaginal muscles are naturally tight, so to help prevent condom breakage, lubrication (and a lot of it) is a must.

Question: Has the condom ever broke on you?

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SurveyStud: In the App Store