10 Surprising Statistics on Women in the Workplace: SurveyStud

Take a moment to read through these ten eye-opening stats to see where women really are in the working world and get some inspiration to see where changes need to be made and where advancements can be lauded for this generation and the next.

1. Women comprise 46% of the total U.S. labor force. With almost half of the workforce being women, female employees aren’t exactly a rarity. For most women today, getting a job is an expected part of life. This is a big change from past decades. In 1900, fewer than 20% of women participated in the labor market while today the number is around 75% and growing.

2. Women make only 77.5 cents for every dollar that men earn. This figure comes from data on the 2010 census. Despite this gap, many economists feel that the gap between pay for men and women is due to different personal choices men and women make about personal fulfillment, child rearing and hours at work. Whichever you choose to believe, the reality is that the gap is slowly but surely closing as women become increasingly educated and dual income families become the norm, but this isn’t much consolation to those who feel discriminated against today.

3. The more education a woman has, the greater the disparity in her wages. This certainly doesn’t mean women should shy away from professional positions, but they should be aware that they may have to battle harder for equal pay. Women in professional specialty occupations were found to earn just 72.7% of what men in the same position earned, and women in upper level executive, administrative and managerial occupations earned even less at 72.3%. If you compare this against the average of 77.5%, the numbers speak for themselves, and this graphic from the New York Times makes it even easier to see.

4. Women may work longer to receive the promotions that provide access to higher pay. One example provided by the National Center for Education Statistics shows that women often have to work three years longer in a teaching position to be promoted to a principal than their male counterparts. Some studies suggest that this is because women and men adapt different strategies when it comes to management and pursuing promotions, yet other studies connect it less to work and more to gender-based biases.

5. Women business owners employ 35% more people than all the Fortune 500 companies combined. If you’re like most people, you don’t picture a woman when you think about a business owner. Yet there are about 9.1 million women-owned businesses in the U.S., a number that comprises nearly 40% of all businesses. The idea that women don’t make good managers just doesn’t hold up when you look at these kinds of numbers, with women managing a large number of employees and making healthy profits while doing so.

6. Women account for 46% of the labor force, but 59% of workers making less than $8 an hour. What does it mean? It means that many women are taking on jobs that pay well under a living wage. With nearly 16% of U.S. households having women who are divorced, widowed or never married as the sole providers, this leaves many women at a distinct disadvantage and struggling to make ends meet as they dominate jobs in low paying fields.

7. Only 53% of employers provide at least some replacement pay during periods of maternity leave. Despite the fact that the arrival of a child means extra bills and expenses, many employers don’t provide women with any benefits if they to leave work temporarily to have a child. While there is no law requiring companies to offer paid maternity leave, considering it is an issue that primarily affects women, it’s certainly a blow to their income potential and ability to care for their families and themselves.

8. Four in ten businesses worldwide have no women in senior management. This shouldn’t be a surprise given the way many countries feel about women in the workplace. Here in the United States, however, women still feel the stress of trying to break into upper management, with 93% of the 439 senior women executives surveyed by Korn/Ferry International in 1992 feeling that a glass ceiling for women still existed. Yet new studies report that women outnumber men as managers in fields like human resources, health administration and education–perhaps stemming from reports that many businesses have seen a direct financial impact from hiring women.

9. Women earned less than men in 99% of all occupations. In virtually every field that women choose to enter, they can expect to earn less over their lifetime than their male counterparts. This means that over 47 years of full-time work, this gap amounts to an estimated loss in wages for women of $700,000 for high school graduates, $1.2 million for college grads, and $2 million for professional school grads–a staggering amount.

10. Minority women fare the worst when it comes to equal pay.
African-American women earn 64 cents to every dollar earned by white men and Hispanic women just 52 cents per dollar. Whether it’s attitudes about race or gender that are at play, it’s clear that something needs to be done to level the playing field.

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

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Single Mom-Family Stats: SurveyStud

Who are single moms today? These single mom statistics might surprise you:

There are 10 million single mother-lead families in the United States (Census). 3x the number in 1960.

– 25% of families are headed by single moms. (Pew).

– 40% of babies born in the United States are born to single mothers. (Pew)
 
Millennial single mom statistics

– 57% of babies born to millennials were out of wedlock. (John’s Hopkins)

– 64% of millennial moms reported at least one birth out of wedlock. (John’s Hopkins)

More educated millennials are having babies outside of marriage. Of millennial moms who have babies outside of marriage:

– 67% have some college education, and 32% have four or more years of higher education. (John’s Hopkins)

Older single mom statistics

– 48% jump in births to unmarried women age 35-39 (CDC)

– 29% jump in births to unmarried moms aged 40-44 (CDC)

While the rate of babies born to single mothers has declined slightly, there is a notable rise in babies born to single moms by choice – women who tend to be older, more educated, higher income. (CDC)

Single moms’ education and income:

– 58% of single moms have attended college or have at least a bachelor’s degree (Pew)
Of millennial moms who have babies outside of marriage

– 67% have some college education, and 32% have four or more years of higher education. (John’s Hopkins)

– 32% earn $40,000+ (Census)

– 10% earn $80,000+ (Census)

Single moms are overwhelmingly doing it all alone:

– 51% of custodial parents have child support agreements (informal or formal), but only 41% received all child support owed. (Census)

– Of fathers who live apart from their children, only 22% of dads see their kids more than once per week. (Pew)

What is driving single mom trends?

There are 1.2 million divorces in the United States each year. (Census)

Traditional nuclear families with two married heterosexual parents are now the minority of U.S.

The rise of single motherhood is the largest influence on this trend — followed by gay families, multigenerational families and . (Pew)

– 46% millennials and 44% GenXers say “Marriage is becoming obsolete.” (Pew)

Working vs Non-Working Mom: SurveyStud

Key Mom Stats:

2 billion in the World (82.5 million in the U.S.)

First-time Moms: Average age of new moms is 25, vs. 21 in 1970

Kids: Modern moms average 2 kids (1950s: 3.5 kids; 1700s: 7-10 kids)

4.3 babies are born each second

Working Moms

72% of moms with children over 1 year old work (about the same as childless women) , vs. 39% in 1976

55% of moms with a child under 1 year old work, vs. 31% in 1976

Moms with a full-time job spend 13 hours working at the office or at home on family chores

Baby Chores

Diaper Changes: 7,300 by baby’s 2nd birthday

Diaper Changing Speed: Moms take 2 minutes, 5 seconds (adds up to 3 40-hour work weeks each year!) , vs. 1 minute, 36 seconds for dads

Giving Attention: Preschooler requires mom’s attention once every 4 minutes or 210 times / day

Taking Care: Preschooler moms spend 2.7 hrs / day on primary childcare, vs. 1.2 hours for dads

Household Chores

Chores: Women average 2.2 hrs / day, vs. 1.3 hrs / day for men

Laundry: 88% is done by moms, totaling 330 loads of laundry & 5,300 articles of clothing each year

Least Favorite Chore: Vacuuming the stairs
Bathroom Multi-Tasking for Moms: Reading is the most common activity, followed by talking on the phone, meditating, watching TV, drinking coffee, eating and balancing the checkbook

Misc Mommy & Baby Facts

Most popular birth month: July

Most popular birth day: Tuesday

Most popular birthday: October 5

30 Pounds: Average weight gain during pregnancy

Baby Gender Gap: 105 boys born for every 100 girls

First Year Baby Costs: $7,000 of baby items before 1st birthday

Cost of Raising a Child: Middle-income families spend $242,070 to raise a kid to 18 (not incl. college!)

Most Popular Names of 21st Century

Baby Girls: Emily, Madison, Hannah

Baby Boys: Jacob, Michael, Joshua

Research suggests that moms who give birth later in life, live longer

Source: Statistica

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Setbacks: SurveyStud

When bad things happen, it’s easy to feel like a victim. Circumstances can feel out of control, and many of them actually are. But asking this question forces you to accept whatever has happened and to shift your mentality towards harnessing it in a constructive manner. While this is empowering, it may take a long time before you’re ready to ask what you can create from it.

I don’t want to sugarcoat this. So rather than immediately asking this question, I recommend looking at a four-step process. For minor setbacks this process may be fast, for major ones it may be long — there’s no “right” timeline. 

1. Accept whatever has happened: The first step is to accept whatever has happened. Acceptance may seem as simple as saying “well that happened,” but often we need to go through other phases to get there. It may look a bit like the Kubler-Ross stages of grief: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and finally, acceptance.

2. Give yourself time and space to recover: When Steve Jobs got fired, he admitted that he “really didn’t know what to do for a few months. I felt that I had let the previous generation of entrepreneurs down, that I had dropped the baton as it was being passed to me.”

Like Jobs, most of us need time to process our setbacks and “land” from them before we can think about creating from them. Stuffing your emotions may seem helpful in the short run, but it will ultimately hold you back. Instead, be compassionate with yourself and allow yourself space to heal or grieve. Go through it, not around it. Acceptance and recovery takes time. 

3. Get in the right frame of mind: As you recover, now is a good time to start rejuvenating yourself physically, emotionally and spiritually. Take small steps that help you get into the right frame of mind. Go to yoga or kickboxing class. Pray. Read a new book. Don’t worry so much about the future; just do what you need to do to regain your positive energy.

4. Ask the question: Once you’ve taken the above steps and are feeling a strong sense of self again, now is the time to ask the magic question: What can I create from this? Try brainstorming all of the different ways your setback could become the best thing that ever happened to you. It may be hard at first, but eventually you will turn a corner start begin brimming with possibility.

StartUp Growth: SurveyStud

Mohan Sawhney, a professor at the Northwestern Kellogg School of Management, notes that “[while] it’s tempting to view business growth as a smooth, linear path, the reality is much more complicated.” Often, the talent and leadership that enable rapid expansion in a company’s early stages may not be enough to keep fueling high growth and this causes businesses to stagnate.

Four fundamental steps growth-stage businesses must take:

1. Stay focused on what sells best.

Many startups fail because they spread themselves too thin at the growth stage. They try to do everything for any client or they try to expand into multiple new markets simultaneously. And many times these strategies just do not work.

Instead, business owners should concentrate on core business areas. Expansion is a must but thoughtful, targeted growth is what wins the day. Being too opportunistic can waste precious resources, as well as take focus away from what made them successful in the first place.

2. Then innovate and expand strategically.

During the growth stage, pivoting towards what sells best and moving away from what doesn’t is the key ingredient to maintaining, or even increasing, expectations. Entrepreneurs need to strategize and innovate into niches that will help the core business expand.

Consider everything Uber has done to date. Uber continues to penetrate new and potentially lucrative markets around the world. Their mobile payment services have evolved to accommodate multiple payment options, which has proved useful in international markets–thus the company is consistently increasing its selection of vehicles. Hence maintaining focus on what it sells best and what its customers want most — rides.

3. Let processes and products take center stage.

During the initial startup phase, many companies rely on the skills of a small core team to seize opportunities and impress clients. But during the growth stage, maintaining that level of quality becomes a very difficult task, especially as core team members move on to new opportunities.

As small businesses transition into the growth stage, they need to standardize business processes so that great experiences can be consistently reproduced. This is accomplished by embedding expertise into the processes and structures that keep a company afloat.

4. Build your brand.

The startup phase is driven by client relationships. A great way to ensure clients think well of a company is to focus on building a positive brand image. This makes it less likely that a customer will leave if their current account manager calls it quits — something many small businesses fear.

By staying laser-focused on what works, pivoting away from what does not, continually innovating, and gauging feedback from your customers with tools like SurveyStud (smartphone survey app), a mid stage company should be able to avoid falling into the trap of the growth plateau. 

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Statistics on Female Self Esteem: SurveyStud

Pressure & Perfectionism

74% of girls say they are under pressure to please everyone (Girls Inc, The Supergirl Dilemma)

98% of girls feel there is an immense pressure from external sources to look a certain way (National Report on Self Esteem)

92% of teen girls would like to change something about the way they look, with body weight ranking the highest. (Dove campaign)

90% of eating disorders are found in girls (National Association for Self Esteem)

1 in 4 girls today fall into a clinical diagnosis – depression, eating disorders, cutting, and other mental/emotional disorders. On top of these, many more report being constantly anxious, sleep deprived, and under significant pressure. (The Triple Bind, Steven Hinshaw)

By age thirteen, 53% of American girls age 13 are “unhappy with their bodies.” This grows to 78% by the time girls reach seventeen.

Gender Disparity

34 women have ever served as governors compared to 2319 men (Center for American Women and Politics)

3% of Fortune 500 CEOs are women (CNN Money)

3% of clout positions in the mainstream media – telecommunications, entertainment, publishing and advertising- are held by women

3% of creative directors within ad agencies are women (Advertising Age)

80% of all purchasing decisions are made by women (Forbes)

89 countries have more women in national legislatures than the United States (Miss Representation/Inter-Parliamentary Union)

29% of American firms are owned by women, yet employ only 6% of the country’s workforce and account for barely 4% of business revenues. 

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Gender vs Survey 

The purpose of this article is to examine the correlation between online (i.e… smartphone via Twitter, Facebook etc.) survey non-response and various demographic factors, including gender.

Studies have shown that trends exist with regard to who responds to surveys, at least with regard to traditional modes of survey administration. Reports suggest that many demographic and other correlates with non-response to online surveys may indeed mirror those of more traditional modes of survey administration. However, the influence of such a basic demographic factor as gender on online survey response behavior is unclear.

In this study, a record-linking technique was employed to compare the gender of online survey respondents directly to available demographic data of all members of a sampling frame, thus allowing comparison of demographic information of both respondents and non-respondents.

The sampling frame, which consisted entirely of university faculty members of a large research university in the southeastern United States with a full-time faculty of approximately 1000, was specifically chosen to minimize the effect of other potential correlates to non-response behavior, such as education level, Smartphone access, geographic location, occupation, and income. Pearson’s chi square analysis showed a significant relationship between gender and survey response rates: female faculty members contributed disproportionately to the respondent data set.

One possible explanations for the observations is that the observed differences in female and male faculty response rates is a product of differences in female and male values operating in a gendered online environment.

Results of this study suggest that researchers should not assume that response behavior toward online surveys, and therefore data gathered from online surveys, is free of gender bias. 

Hence highlights the value of smartphone survey apps such as SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Unemployed: Never Ask For Help

My job search activities started on the very day the bad news came. Updating resumes, refreshing network connections, applying for unemployment benefits to name just a few. It was bad news, you bet, but I felt confident that my unemployed status would be short-lived.

Networking Not Working

Then I attended my first “lunch and learn” meeting sponsored by a professional association. It didn’t go well. I was embarrassed to tell others that I had been laid off, but worse, when asked about my job search plans and goals, I stammered out some words as my unfocused ideas buzzed around my head and slipped out of my mouth. People at the meeting who even had job openings at their companies would politely excuse themselves to connect with others after only a few minutes with me and my unprepared job search ideas.

I walked to the parking lot after that event knowing I needed to get better at planning for and having effective job networking conversations. I didn’t know where to start, but I knew I needed to do something and quickly.

Help Wanted Fast

A career coach recommended a book called The 20-Minute Networking Meeting to give me some practical steps and an easy to follow outline for preparing and engaging in job networking conversations. Here are a few ways that this book has helped me and hopefully will help you.

1) Always Prepare

If you know ahead of time who you will be talking with, spend time learning about their background and experience before the meeting. This preparation helped build up my confidence and saved time for a richer discussion and deeper relationship-building instead of me taking time for things I could have found out on LinkedIn or from some other source.

2) Begin with Relationship

Using the first 2-3 minutes to talk about how you and the network contact are connected will help get the meeting off to a positive start. “I was excited when our mutual friend, Sally, recommended for me to reach out to you. She really enjoyed working with you on the Greenfield project. Did you know Sally before that project?” Adding this tactic to the meeting introduction helped me and my contact feel more at ease (and, yes, networking contacts feel nervous too).

3) Never Ask for a Job

This may sound counter-productive, but wait. I don’t like pushy or manipulative sales people when I am in the market to buy something. Your network contact doesn’t either. Avoiding this direct approach can help you make a great impression by showing off your positive attitude, your skills and experience, and your professionalism. Make a commitment to earn their trust first. If your networking contact has or knows of a job opening, the topic will be introduced by the contact in the meeting. If not, it often will come up in the follow-up communication.

4) Ask “How Can I Help You?”

I have been shocked by how grateful many of my networking contacts have been when I have offered to help them. Sometimes, because of my prior research, I have been able to offer a specific piece of assistance, but other times I just ask the generic version of the question. If you are sincere and really do want to help, it will be appreciated by your contact. It becomes a bit of proof that you are truly willing to serve instead of only looking out for your interests.

These are just a few of the tips and ideas from the book that helped me. I hope they can make your networking more enjoyable and effective

As usual if this seems plagiarized that’s because it probably is–if you see something that’s yours let me know and I will remove it. Cool Beans…

Embracing Ambiguity 

Instead of offering definitive answers to the country’s biggest questions, the 2016 election results provoke even larger questions. How could the forecasters and the campaigns themselves been so wrong? What and maybe who did all the pollsters miss? Was there a late breaking voter phenomenon that was hard to measure?

These are critically important questions, and investigations are already underway. We may find answers to many of them; we may find others where the evidence will not be conclusive. But we need to let the chips fall where they may, including on my plate as a pollster with a newer platform.

I’m confident in one fact: we canvassed enough people. At SurveyStud we interviewed thousands over the course of the campaign, more than any other public source and more than the campaigns themselves. Our data consistently got big things right: like Donald Trump’s outsized support in the Midwest and Rust Belt.

But there’s another thing that’s absolutely clear to me, and it’s a categorical failing of data wonks trying to grasp certainty through research: too often we are guilty of failing to embrace uncertainty — specifically, the uncertainty embedded in the data itself.

Even our electoral map contained clues that the prevailing narrative was wrong. In our final 50-state map, we had Clinton with only 257 solid Electoral College votes, shy of the 270 needed to win and trending down from the 307 number we showed when we launched our daily tracking two weeks before Election Day. The rest were toss-ups. Our own data showed an open path for Trump. But the surface narrative lined up with the Clinton sweep that our own national numbers and everyone else was pointing to — from the New York Times to HuffPollster to the neuroscientist tapped as this year’s “Nate Silver.” Even the Trump senior adviser who told CNN on Election Day that it would “take a miracle for us to win. It all made the countervailing data points seem smaller than they should have appeared.

Now, people are asking if they can ever trust data again. In fact, we need data more than ever.

We will understand our numerical misses only by getting more information, doing deeper data analysis, and committing to even more rigorous efforts to constantly challenge our assumptions. Since pride tripped us up, humility may prove a better guide.

Some of the big areas for further exploration throughout the polling industry are already clear:

Likely voter models. Whatever the true magnitude of the errors this year, estimating who will actually cast a ballot — a future, yet-to-exist population — has long been a weak part of survey research. In the end, this year’s surveys may have collectively done a really good job at registering voter preferences, but where we all seemed to have slipped is in adequately gauging intent. It’s one thing to support a candidate in one’s head, with a yard sign, or on a survey. It’s another thing entirely to cast an actual ballot for that candidate. We need better, more reliable ways to bridge the gap between attitudes and actions.

Uncertainty estimates. We need better, more user-friendly ways to express the likely variability around polling estimates. More sophisticated poll consumers expect a “plus or minus” around our numbers, but even they latch onto the specific numbers we present. In a sports-dominated culture, numbers automatically become scores. A false sense of precision sets in when media narratives get created out of those numbers. For the most numerate out there, forecasters’ probabilities are a welcome and sufficient way to build in some doubt. Everyone else needs something more.

We are working on all of these challenges — and have the tools to tackle them. At SurveyStud, we’ve built a methodologically rigorous, smartphone-based program for political polls that rivals the best surveys around. But surveys need to be better, and we have the tools to improve our data even more. We’re already moving to develop advanced adjustments to our samples to handle a range of non-response issues; we will leverage external data to make more robust likely-voter models; and we will make everything, including possible errors, more comprehensible.

As usual if this seems plagiarized that’s because it probably is–so if you see something and I need to remove it let me know.  Cool Beans…

Throwing Money Away… Learn to Validate

…are you validating your idea before spending money on it.  

I ran a social experiment with members of a Young Entrepreneur Council, where we discussed best practices to validate ideas before spending money. Below are some unique responses:

Use smoke tests.

An easy way to gauge interest in an idea is to run some basic tests. I recommend running a basic Craigslist ad to gauge interest. For example, perhaps you want to start a business around hiring babysitters online. First, place an ad that offers the services. Do people contact you? This is a cheap and effective way to glean feedback on a startup or related ideas.

A good friend of mine says he generally places an idea on a site like LaunchRock, which helps people to quickly set up a “Launching Soon” page. He then invests in Facebook ads and watches click-through rates. If a good number of people sign up, it means there’s real interest, and it’s time to take the next step.

Assess yourself.

Instead of focusing on building products that are simply “cool” or “innovative,” ask yourself if the product is something you would use.  The easiest way to validate an idea, is to first “survey a market of one: yourself.”

Conduct a survey.

Survey Apps like SurveyStud (Yes this is my product (Download from the App Store) can help you gather feedback on your ideas. Create one and share it on your Facebook page, Twitter feed, and LinkedIn profile, or send it out to trusted professionals, friends, former co-workers, students, and family in email blasts. This is another great way to gauge needs, interest, and gaps in specific industries.

Find a mentor or industry advisor.

There are always going to be people who have expertise or experience you lack. Don’t shy away from them–introduce yourself and make a connection. That way, you have a valuable contact in the industry of your choice to determine where the needs are, and how you can address them.

Trust your gut.

It will lead somewhere, maybe it results in a successful product, maybe it won’t. Either way you get a valuable education in what works that will help you later on.

What methods have you used to test your own ideas?

As usual if it seems this or parts of this is plagiarized–it probably is.  Regardless if you find something that’s yours let me know so I can take it down…