The “Print” đź‘€

Ladies. I know you see it. I KNOW you’ve noticed. You know what time is it.

Just like men have their “Sundress Season” excitement, we have our “Sweatpants Season.”

To me, this is not only the most wonderful time of the year (wink), but it is also common knowledge. ‘Tis the season right? Please don’t act like you don’t know what I’m talking about. I know people usually call this “Sweatpants Season”, but I think it’s important to point out what color is prevalent among these here photos we see! For years, men have anticipated the summertime, where a flowing sundress accentuates every part of a woman’s body. So why can’t we notice and appreciation when a man’s body is being accentuated?

I was told by a man that it was wrong for us women to even be looking at the print of a man in gray sweatpants. His argument is that women do not like to be objectified or glared at by the choice of clothing they choose to wear. While I don’t entirely disagree with what he’s saying, I do see his point. I’ve heard women complain about men staring at their bodies, and it’s usually because they have their own insecurities that they are working on with it. I know women who love wearing sundresses because they love the attention they receive. I think men are no different. Some men hate that they are judged by the print of clothing they choose to wear for comfort. Some men love that they have a good print in their sweatpants. They know it can attract a woman in a way that verbal sexual advances can’t.

I find it interesting that some men tend to be completely insecure about what women think of them in sweatpants. These same men either bash women if they don’t have the perfect figure, or they can’t understand why women have their own body insecurities. When I asked a male about this he explained it in a way that I guess I can kind of understand. Women can work on their bodies and change its shape overtime. The print is something that can’t be changed with exercise and a good diet. Of course there are cosmetic enhancements that can be made to any body, but for the most part, men don’t believe in getting it done, and if it has been done, they are not vocal about it.

It’s easy to say you don’t objectify one sex or the other, but I think it is something we all do. Let’s not take life so seriously! Enjoy the beauty of one another’s bodies. Compliment each other! Enjoy the season, whichever it may be!

Question: Ladies, how many thirst traps have you seen in sweatpants at the gym?

I, too, have been a victim of the salacious images of men in sweatpants.

Leave a comment below…

SurveyStud: In the ApAp Store

Coffee or Tea which is better

Coffee and tea are not just simple beverages. According to Amy Goldenberg, Consumer Research Analyst, SurveyStud, Inc, coffee contains hundreds of different substances. Tea also has a variety of different substances such as theobromine, amino acids and antioxidants.

Caffeine and Health

Caffeine is present in both tea and coffee and does have health effects. The Linus Pauling Institute reports that an 8-ounce cup of coffee normally contains 72 to 130 mg of caffeine; black tea has 42 to 72 milligrams; and green tea 9 to 50 milligrams. Drugs.com notes caffeine can cause heartburn, sleep problems and anxiety, and increase blood pressure. People who are particularly sensitive to caffeine may react to relatively small amounts.

Coffee vs. Tea

Melinda Beck reported in the “Wall Street Journal” in December 2009 that coffee can decrease the risk of developing diabetes, stroke, Alzheimer’s disease and prostate cancer, but increase the risk of gallstones. The amount of coffee in each of these situations varied from three to six cups of coffee per day. On the other hand, the Linus Pauling Institute notes that tea protects against heart disease – both green and black tea are effective – while green tea protects against stroke and black tea protects against osteoporosis. The Institute notes that teas have been found to inhibit the growth of bacteria that cause tooth decay. Green tea can also interact with some medications, notably the blood thinner Coumadin, and tea may inhibit the absorption of iron from non-meat sources.

The University of Maryland reports that green tea reduces inflammation in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, may help to regulate blood glucose, and seems to protect the liver from damage. However, the university says that while green tea in particular has a reputation as a cancer preventative, the data at this time is inconclusive.

When Neither Drink Shows an Advantage
Sometimes neither coffee nor tea has a particular benefit. G. Fagherazzi noted in the April 2011 “Public Health and Nutrition,” that coffee, tea and caffeine intake had no relationship to breast cancer risk. Sometimes coffee and tea have similar benefits; a study led by K. Tanaka reported in the April 2011 issue of “Parkinsonism and Related Disorders” that coffee, black tea, Japanese and Chinese teas decreased the risk of Parkinson’s disease.

SurveyStud: In the App Store