50.8% of Women: SurveyStud

Women are 50.8% of the U.S. population, yet:

– They earn almost 60% of undergraduate degrees, and 60% of all master’s degrees.

– They earn 47% of all law degrees, and 48% of all medical degrees.

– They earn more than 44% of master’s degrees in business and management, including 37% of MBAs.

– They are 47% of the U.S. labor force, and 59% of the college-educated, entry-level workforce.

And yet…

Although they hold almost 52% of all professional-level jobs, American women lag substantially behind men when it comes to their representation in leadership positions:

– They are only 14.6% of executive officers, 8.1% of top earners, and 4.6% of Fortune 500 CEOs.

– They hold just 16.9% of Fortune 500 board seats.

– In the financial services industry, they make up 54.2% of the labor force, but are only 12.4% of executive officers, and 18.3% of board directors. None are CEOs.

– They account for 78.4% of the labor force in health care and social assistance but only 14.6% of executive officers and 12.4% of board directors. None, again, are CEOs.

– In the legal field, they are 45.4% of associates—but only 25% of nonequity partners and 15% of equity partners.

– In medicine, they comprise 34.3% of all physicians and surgeons but only 15.9% of medical school deans.

– In information technology, they hold only 9% of management positions and account for only 14% of senior management positions at Silicon Valley startups.

– Although women control 80% of consumer spending in the United States, they are only 3% of creative directors in advertising.

Source: Contact for information

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Women: SurveyStud

Although the Affordable Care Act will give more low-income single mothers access to health insurance, nearly half of these families reside in states that have declined to expand their Medicaid programs.

Among the 23 states not currently expanding Medicaid, the average eligibility threshold remains very low at 49% or about $7700 for a single mother with a child.

TEEN MOTHERS

A third of all unintended pregnancies are to unmarried women in their 20s — about 60% ended in birth; 26% ended in abortion; and the rest ended in miscarriage.

Black and Hispanic women have the highest teen pregnancy rates — 100 and 84 per 1,000 women aged 15–19, respectively; whites have the lowest rate with 38 pregnancies per 1,000.

In 2013, 15% of the 1.6 million children born out of wedlock in the U.S. were to teenagers under age 20, 37% were to women ages 20 through 24.

Black women are more likely to have children outside of marriage than other racial or ethnic groups. In that year, about 72% of births to black women were non-marital births.

Children born to young unmarried mothers are most likely to grow up in a single-parent household. More than two thirds end up on welfare.

ACCESS TO CHILD CARE

Nationally the annual cost of center-based infant care averaged over 40% of the state median income for a single mother. About 32% for a school-age child.

In Oregon, Massachusetts and New York, a single mother of an infant ages 0-3 would have to pay more than half of her income for day care at a center.

Child care subsidy, if eligible, is hard to come by. In 2013, 19 states had wait lists or had frozen their intake for child care assistance, with wait times ranging from 90 days to two years.

ACCESS TO EDUCATION

Single mothers often spend over half of their income on housing expenses and a third on child care,leaving them with less money for educational expenses.

Without financial aid, single mother students — a total of about 2 million — have little or no means to contribute financially to their educational expenses.

Nearly two thirds (61.2%) receive an “automatic zero” expected family contribution (EFC) on their financial aid award, compared to 29.6% of postsecondary students without children.

COMPARED TO SINGLE MOTHERS IN PEER COUNTRIES

The majority of single mothers in the United States are separated, divorced or widowed; and they work more hours and yet have higher poverty rates than single mothers in other high-income countries.

This is due to the fact that many employed single mothers are earning poverty wages. About 40% of U.S. single parents were employed in low-wage jobs — exceptionally high compared to single parents in peer countries.

Source: Contact us

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Single Mother Stats: SurveyStud

Once largely limited to poor women and minorities, single motherhood is now becoming the new “social-norm.”

This prevalence is due in part to the growing trend of children born outside marriage — a societal trend that was virtually unheard of decades ago.

About 4 of 10 or 40% of children were born to unwed mothers. Nearly two-thirds are born to mothers under the age of 30.2

Of all single-parent families in the U.S., single mothers make up the majority.

According to U.S. Census Bureau, out of 12 million single parent families in 2015, more than 80% were headed by single mothers.

Today 1 in 4 or 25% of children under the age of 18 — a total of about 17.4 million — are being raised without a father and nearly half (45%) live below the poverty line.

For those living with father, about 21% live in poverty. In contrast, among children living with both parents, 13% are counted as poor.

STATISTICS OF SINGLE PARENT FAMILIES * (2015)

– 84% Single Mom Family
– 16% Single Dad Family

DEMOGRAPHICS

– Around 49% of single mothers have never married

– 51% are either divorced, separated or widowed. Half have one child, 30% have two.

– About two thirds are White, one third Black, one quarter Hispanic. One third have a college degree, while one sixth have not completed high school.

EMPLOYMENT

two thirds of single mothers are working outside the home, a slightly greater share than the share of married mothers who are also working outside the home.

However, only half are employed full-time all year long, a quarter (23.2%) are jobless the entire year. Among those who were laid off or looking for work, less than a quarter (22.4%) received unemployment benefits.

If a single mother is able to work, her earning power still lags significantly compared with men’s, about 78¢ to a $1 for the same job — leaving a wage gap of 23 cents on the dollar.

The wage disparities are even greater for women of color — African-American women earn only 64¢, while Hispanic and Latinas fare worse, being paid just 56¢ on the dollar.

INCOME

Single mothers earn income that place them well below married mothers in the income ladder. The gap between the two groups is significantly large.

The median income for families led by a single mother in 2015 was about $26,000, one third (⅓) the median for married couple families ($84,000.) Nearly half with an annual income of less than $25,000.

Source: Contact us for information

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Effective Feedback: SurveyStud

Feedback is valuable information that will be used to make important decisions. Top performing companies are top performing companies because they consistently search for ways to make their best even better. For top performing companies ‘continuous improvement’ is not just a showy catchphrase.

Effective feedback has benefits for the giver, the receiver, and the wider organization. Here are five reasons why feedback is so important.

1. Feedback is always there. If you ask someone in your organization when feedback occurs, they will typically mention an employee survey, performance appraisal, or training evaluation. In actuality, feedback is around us all the time. Every time we speak to a person, employee, customer, vendor, etc., we communicate feedback. In actuality, it’s impossible not to give feedback.

2. Feedback is effective listening. Whether the feedback is done verbally or via a feedback survey, the person providing the feedback needs to know they have been understood (or received) and they need to know that their feedback provides some value. When conducting a survey, always explain why respondents’ feedback is important and how their feedback will be used.

3. Feedback can motivate. By asking for feedback, it can actually motivate employees to perform better. Employees like to feel valued and appreciate being asked to provide feedback that can help formulate business decisions. And feedback from client, suppliers, vendors, and stakeholders can be used to motivate to build better working relations

4. Feedback can improve performance. Feedback is often mistaken for criticism. In fact, what is viewed as negative criticism is actually constructive criticism and is the best find of feedback that can help to formulate better decisions to improve and increase performance.

5. Feedback is a tool for continued learning. Invest time in asking and learning about how others experience working with your organization. Continued feedback is important across the entire organization in order to remain aligned to goals, create strategies, develop products and services improvements, improve relationships, and much more. Continued learning is the key to improving.

10 Surprising Statistics on Women in the Workplace: SurveyStud

Take a moment to read through these ten eye-opening stats to see where women really are in the working world and get some inspiration to see where changes need to be made and where advancements can be lauded for this generation and the next.

1. Women comprise 46% of the total U.S. labor force. With almost half of the workforce being women, female employees aren’t exactly a rarity. For most women today, getting a job is an expected part of life. This is a big change from past decades. In 1900, fewer than 20% of women participated in the labor market while today the number is around 75% and growing.

2. Women make only 77.5 cents for every dollar that men earn. This figure comes from data on the 2010 census. Despite this gap, many economists feel that the gap between pay for men and women is due to different personal choices men and women make about personal fulfillment, child rearing and hours at work. Whichever you choose to believe, the reality is that the gap is slowly but surely closing as women become increasingly educated and dual income families become the norm, but this isn’t much consolation to those who feel discriminated against today.

3. The more education a woman has, the greater the disparity in her wages. This certainly doesn’t mean women should shy away from professional positions, but they should be aware that they may have to battle harder for equal pay. Women in professional specialty occupations were found to earn just 72.7% of what men in the same position earned, and women in upper level executive, administrative and managerial occupations earned even less at 72.3%. If you compare this against the average of 77.5%, the numbers speak for themselves, and this graphic from the New York Times makes it even easier to see.

4. Women may work longer to receive the promotions that provide access to higher pay. One example provided by the National Center for Education Statistics shows that women often have to work three years longer in a teaching position to be promoted to a principal than their male counterparts. Some studies suggest that this is because women and men adapt different strategies when it comes to management and pursuing promotions, yet other studies connect it less to work and more to gender-based biases.

5. Women business owners employ 35% more people than all the Fortune 500 companies combined. If you’re like most people, you don’t picture a woman when you think about a business owner. Yet there are about 9.1 million women-owned businesses in the U.S., a number that comprises nearly 40% of all businesses. The idea that women don’t make good managers just doesn’t hold up when you look at these kinds of numbers, with women managing a large number of employees and making healthy profits while doing so.

6. Women account for 46% of the labor force, but 59% of workers making less than $8 an hour. What does it mean? It means that many women are taking on jobs that pay well under a living wage. With nearly 16% of U.S. households having women who are divorced, widowed or never married as the sole providers, this leaves many women at a distinct disadvantage and struggling to make ends meet as they dominate jobs in low paying fields.

7. Only 53% of employers provide at least some replacement pay during periods of maternity leave. Despite the fact that the arrival of a child means extra bills and expenses, many employers don’t provide women with any benefits if they to leave work temporarily to have a child. While there is no law requiring companies to offer paid maternity leave, considering it is an issue that primarily affects women, it’s certainly a blow to their income potential and ability to care for their families and themselves.

8. Four in ten businesses worldwide have no women in senior management. This shouldn’t be a surprise given the way many countries feel about women in the workplace. Here in the United States, however, women still feel the stress of trying to break into upper management, with 93% of the 439 senior women executives surveyed by Korn/Ferry International in 1992 feeling that a glass ceiling for women still existed. Yet new studies report that women outnumber men as managers in fields like human resources, health administration and education–perhaps stemming from reports that many businesses have seen a direct financial impact from hiring women.

9. Women earned less than men in 99% of all occupations. In virtually every field that women choose to enter, they can expect to earn less over their lifetime than their male counterparts. This means that over 47 years of full-time work, this gap amounts to an estimated loss in wages for women of $700,000 for high school graduates, $1.2 million for college grads, and $2 million for professional school grads–a staggering amount.

10. Minority women fare the worst when it comes to equal pay.
African-American women earn 64 cents to every dollar earned by white men and Hispanic women just 52 cents per dollar. Whether it’s attitudes about race or gender that are at play, it’s clear that something needs to be done to level the playing field.

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Breast Cancer Stats 2016: SurveyStud

In 2016, an estimated 246,660 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in women in the U.S., along with 61,000 new cases of non-invasive (in situ) breast cancer.

1 in 8 or 12% of U.S. women will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime.

About 2,600 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed in men in 2016. A man’s lifetime risk of breast cancer is about 1 in 1,000.

Breast cancer incidence rates in the U.S. began decreasing in the year 2000, after increasing for the previous two decades. They dropped by 7% from 2002 to 2003 alone. One theory is that this decrease was partially due to the reduced use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) by women after the results of a large study called the Women’s Health Initiative were published in 2002. These results suggested a connection between HRT and increased breast cancer risk.

About 40,450 women in the U.S. are expected to die in 2016 from breast cancer, though death rates have been decreasing since 1989. Women under 50 have experienced larger decreases. These decreases are thought to be the result of treatment advances, earlier detection through screening, and increased awareness.

For women in the U.S., breast cancer death rates are higher than those for any other cancer, besides lung cancer.

Besides skin cancer, breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among American women. In 2016, it’s estimated that just under 30% of newly diagnosed cancers in women will be breast cancers.

In women under 45, breast cancer is more common in African-American women than white women. Overall, African-American women are more likely to die of breast cancer. For Asian, Hispanic, and Native-American women, the risk of developing and dying from breast cancer is lower.

In 2016, there are more than 2.8 million women with a history of breast cancer in the U.S. This includes women currently being treated and women who have finished treatment.

A woman’s risk of breast cancer nearly doubles if she has a first-degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) who has been diagnosed with breast cancer. Less than 15% of women who get breast cancer have a family member diagnosed with it.

About 5-10% of breast cancers can be linked to gene mutations (abnormal changes) inherited from one’s mother or father. Mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are the most common. On average, women with a BRCA1 mutation have a 55-65% lifetime risk of developing breast cancer. For women with a BRCA2 mutation, the risk is 45%. Breast cancer that is positive for the BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations tends to develop more often in younger women. An increased ovarian cancer risk is also associated with these genetic mutations. In men, BRCA2 mutations are associated with a lifetime breast cancer risk of about 6.8%; BRCA1 mutations are a less frequent cause of breast cancer in men.

About 85% of breast cancers occur in women who have no family history of breast cancer. These occur due to genetic mutations that happen as a result of the aging process and life in general, rather than inherited mutations.

The most significant risk factors for breast cancer are gender (being a woman) and age (growing older).

Source: BreastCancer.org

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Single Mom-Family Stats: SurveyStud

Who are single moms today? These single mom statistics might surprise you:

There are 10 million single mother-lead families in the United States (Census). 3x the number in 1960.

– 25% of families are headed by single moms. (Pew).

– 40% of babies born in the United States are born to single mothers. (Pew)
 
Millennial single mom statistics

– 57% of babies born to millennials were out of wedlock. (John’s Hopkins)

– 64% of millennial moms reported at least one birth out of wedlock. (John’s Hopkins)

More educated millennials are having babies outside of marriage. Of millennial moms who have babies outside of marriage:

– 67% have some college education, and 32% have four or more years of higher education. (John’s Hopkins)

Older single mom statistics

– 48% jump in births to unmarried women age 35-39 (CDC)

– 29% jump in births to unmarried moms aged 40-44 (CDC)

While the rate of babies born to single mothers has declined slightly, there is a notable rise in babies born to single moms by choice – women who tend to be older, more educated, higher income. (CDC)

Single moms’ education and income:

– 58% of single moms have attended college or have at least a bachelor’s degree (Pew)
Of millennial moms who have babies outside of marriage

– 67% have some college education, and 32% have four or more years of higher education. (John’s Hopkins)

– 32% earn $40,000+ (Census)

– 10% earn $80,000+ (Census)

Single moms are overwhelmingly doing it all alone:

– 51% of custodial parents have child support agreements (informal or formal), but only 41% received all child support owed. (Census)

– Of fathers who live apart from their children, only 22% of dads see their kids more than once per week. (Pew)

What is driving single mom trends?

There are 1.2 million divorces in the United States each year. (Census)

Traditional nuclear families with two married heterosexual parents are now the minority of U.S.

The rise of single motherhood is the largest influence on this trend — followed by gay families, multigenerational families and . (Pew)

– 46% millennials and 44% GenXers say “Marriage is becoming obsolete.” (Pew)

Working vs Non-Working Mom: SurveyStud

Key Mom Stats:

2 billion in the World (82.5 million in the U.S.)

First-time Moms: Average age of new moms is 25, vs. 21 in 1970

Kids: Modern moms average 2 kids (1950s: 3.5 kids; 1700s: 7-10 kids)

4.3 babies are born each second

Working Moms

72% of moms with children over 1 year old work (about the same as childless women) , vs. 39% in 1976

55% of moms with a child under 1 year old work, vs. 31% in 1976

Moms with a full-time job spend 13 hours working at the office or at home on family chores

Baby Chores

Diaper Changes: 7,300 by baby’s 2nd birthday

Diaper Changing Speed: Moms take 2 minutes, 5 seconds (adds up to 3 40-hour work weeks each year!) , vs. 1 minute, 36 seconds for dads

Giving Attention: Preschooler requires mom’s attention once every 4 minutes or 210 times / day

Taking Care: Preschooler moms spend 2.7 hrs / day on primary childcare, vs. 1.2 hours for dads

Household Chores

Chores: Women average 2.2 hrs / day, vs. 1.3 hrs / day for men

Laundry: 88% is done by moms, totaling 330 loads of laundry & 5,300 articles of clothing each year

Least Favorite Chore: Vacuuming the stairs
Bathroom Multi-Tasking for Moms: Reading is the most common activity, followed by talking on the phone, meditating, watching TV, drinking coffee, eating and balancing the checkbook

Misc Mommy & Baby Facts

Most popular birth month: July

Most popular birth day: Tuesday

Most popular birthday: October 5

30 Pounds: Average weight gain during pregnancy

Baby Gender Gap: 105 boys born for every 100 girls

First Year Baby Costs: $7,000 of baby items before 1st birthday

Cost of Raising a Child: Middle-income families spend $242,070 to raise a kid to 18 (not incl. college!)

Most Popular Names of 21st Century

Baby Girls: Emily, Madison, Hannah

Baby Boys: Jacob, Michael, Joshua

Research suggests that moms who give birth later in life, live longer

Source: Statistica

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Pinterest Stats: SurveyStud

You might be thinking why I am talking about this particular social media platform.

Let’s just say Pinterest is just another social media website, which is only there to make friends and socialize. But numbers never lie and that is what we are going to show to all you business & marketing enthusiasts.

I am going to share some of the mind-boggling facts about Pinterest that will surely prove the importance of this exquisite dais for businesses.

– Pinterest has over 75 billion (with a B) Pins and 1.5 billion boards

– 80% of all Pinners access Pinterest via a mobile device

– About 70% of Pinners are saving or clicking on Pins (not just visiting)

– 3/4 of the content people Pin comes from businesses

– The average amount per order that derives from Pinterest traffic is between $140 and $180

– Pinterest Drives More Traffic to Publishers Than Twitter, LinkedIn, Reddit Combined

– A Pinner who close-ups on a pin is 1.6x more likely to sign up or convert.

– A Pinner who saves is 3.9x more likely to sign up and 1.6x more likely to convert.

– A Pinner who clicks thru is 4.5x more likely to sign up and 7x more likely to convert.

– Over 50% of women in the US are on Pinterest.

– 90% of users on Pinterest want to purchase.

The business world has seen many ups and downs in recent years, but the emergence of Pinterest has truly been a boon. Although, yet not enough businesses are looking up to Pinterest and hence its true potential is yet to be discovered fully.

Marketers/People often talk about other social media platforms and yet here I am able to give you all the numbers supporting my case for Pinterest. Hopefully, as a wise  professional you will be ready to boost your online presence by choosing this amazing stage.

Source: Brandongaille, Businessinsider, smartinsights

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i

Kissing Stats: SurveyStud

An average woman kisses about 79 men before getting married

Many women like men in uniform thus statistics show that women prefer to kiss:

– Uniformed Men: 39%

– Lawyers: 37%

– Accountants: 27%

– Athletes: 14%

The world’s longest kiss took place in New York City, lasting 30 hours, 59 minutes, and 27 seconds. Why couldn’t this couple hang on for another 33 seconds to complete the 30th hour? Frencher’s fatigue, perhaps?

A typical French kiss moves 29 muscles in the face

A kiss can contain up to 278 of different bacteria, 95% of which are non-dangerous

Couples transfer an average of 9 milligrams of water, 0.7 milligrams of protein, 0.18 milligrams of organic matter, 0.71 milligrams of fat and 0.45 milligrams of salt to each other with each open-mouthed kiss

Smooching can lead to “hot kissing disease” AKA interinfection of pulmonary tuberculosis, colds, parotitis, scarlet fever, syphilis and nettle rash. But it’s worth it!

Your lips are 100 times more sensitive than the tips of your fingers

A real kiss quickens your pulse to 100 beats in a minute

A long-lasting kiss quickens the pulse and heightens level of hormones in human’s blood so much that it shortens the lifespan by almost a minute

One little kiss burns up to 3 calories. The longer the kiss–the better the exercise!

Men who kiss their wives every morning before going to work live 5 years longer than men who don’t. Pucker up guys!

70% of people aged 16 to 24 years had their first kiss by age 15, whereas only 46% of their parents had smooched by the same age

An average person spends two weeks of his or her life kissing

Best movie kisses:

– 15% – Spiderman upside-down in-the-rain kiss. Mmmm… spidery

– 11.9% – Lady and the Tramp spaghetti kiss. Mmmm… sauces 

SurveyStud: https://appsto.re/us/Ddj18.i