The “Thigh” Gap

I’m a girl with a slim build, I have small boobs and so on. But I have a thigh gap, which I’m kind of proud of because it is desired by girls to have one. But I’m often told that guys don’t actually notice or find it attractive.

Truth is the “thigh gap” has taken the nation’s female population by storm. It’s an unhealthy obsession with thinness that’s causing women to seek often unrealistic standards, fueled by the never-ending stream of social media that puts the coveted thigh gap on a high pedestal.

What is a thigh gap?

You’ve probably seen it all over the web—there are Tumblr accounts devoted to photos of thigh gaps, Twitter accounts dedicated to Cara Delevingne’s thigh gap and even articles with step-by-step instructions on how to get thigh gaps. The thigh gap is a diamond-shaped gap between the thighs that is visible when a woman is standing upright with her feet together. The thigh gap obsession is an alarming new trend focused on achieving and maintaining this space between the thighs, and it’s particularly prevalent among females who are in their teens through their early 20s.

Why is it so popular?

Women on Twitter and Instagram use hashtags like “thinspiration” to post selfies of their thighs as inspiration for weight loss and dieting. Images of slim, attractive models and celebrities in shorts and skinny jeans flood mainstream media, promoting the idea that thinness and fun go hand-in-hand. Fashion trends such as high-waisted, high-legged shorts are causing the thigh gap obsession to become even more prevalent.

Some women are convinced that having a thigh gap is attractive to the opposite sex. When there are pictures of good-looking guys with women who have thigh gaps all over social media, “the implication is you’ll get him if you have the thigh gap,” says Amy Goldenberg, Consumer Research Analyst, SurveyStud, inc.

Given the normal fat distribution on the bodies of women of a healthy weight, achieving a thigh gap can be absolutely unrealistic. Women tend to carry additional fat around their hips, upper arms, buttocks and thighs. Fat on a woman’s body has always been distributed this way.

“Sadly, our standards of beauty involve being unrealistically thin in all of these areas,” Amy says. “There is a small, small proportion of girls and women who are naturally thin, and this kind of appearance is effortless for them; for the vast majority, maintaining this appearance can require dangerous caloric restriction and unhealthy habits. Women who live like this can actually miss out on life, so focused on food and appearance that they lag in their academic performance, job performance and ability to engage with other people and build relationships and friendships.”

Genetics and body structure play the biggest role in determining whether you’re able to gain a thigh gap in the first place. Many models are tall and skinny, and they have wide enough hips to have thigh gaps. Most women, however, have hips that are set too closely together to achieve a thigh gap even if they don’t have much fat on their legs. Many women can only get a thigh gap when they’re too thin to be healthy and there is muscle wasting in their legs due to restrictive eating behaviors. For someone with wider-set hips, however, a thigh gap is possible even with a healthy body weight.

But at the end of the day… [I feel regardless] if you have a gap or not, it really does not matter. Enjoy being you, not what society thinks makes a woman attractive.

Question: Do you think the Thigh Gap is attractive?

Leave a comment below…

SurveyStud: In the App Store

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One thought on “The “Thigh” Gap

  1. I’m skinny as well but to be honest I have never noticed if I’ve had one and I’m not 100% sure I even know what it means. I live in Greece and it’s not as big of a thing here so you’re right it’s just an obsession that’s been caused by social media and although it may be attractive to some, it is definitely not the key to being attractive.

    Liked by 1 person

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